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Asparagus beetle blues

 
Posts: 13
Location: Jonesboro, United States
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Lil snots are hard to stay ahead of. Will put on surround with neem or insecticidal soap. Any other fun ideas?
 
pollinator
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Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
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At the end of the season, remove all the fronds that have berries and clean up well.  The beetle larvae overwinter in the red fruits.

I also have spent time getting the adults to fall into a container of soapy water (you get better at it as time goes by), picking the larvae off the fronds, and even scraping eggs off of the spears early in the season.  The more you can keep up the better.  Totally non-toxic control but a bit labor intensive.  
 
Tim Lutz
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Location: Jonesboro, United States
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From Mother Earth News
Both kinds of asparagus beetles can be easily handpicked. A beetle's instinct is to drop to the ground when it feels disturbed, so hold a container of water under the plant before gently shaking it, and the bugs will drop into the water. A sheet or newspaper or pizza box works well, too.
The best way I found to deal with asparagus beetles is to plant either tomatillos or ground cherries close by. In my garden they will go for those two and forget about the asparagus. I found out by chance. I am able to harvest asparagus and zero ground cherries. The tomatillos' production is reduced.

At the end of the season, remove all the fronds that have berries and clean up well.  The beetle larvae overwinter in the red fruits. 

 
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Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
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I only have four big asparagus plants and four little ones.  I hand pick the beetles as soon as I start encountering them in the spring.  I put my hand under the beetle (two fingers each side of the stem) and nudge them off, then crush with a thumbnail.  They are really good at shuffling round the other side of the stem to hide from me.  They like to lay their eggs on flowers so that's easy to pick off.  If I miss some once they've moved onto laying on leaves, or when they've hatched already, I crush the larvae or nip off badly infested sprigs and drop some distance from the plant.  After a couple of years I have found my problem is much reduced.
 
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