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Help with mallard wounded in predator attack -- what can I do?

 
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I have 10 ducks, three males. My smallest female mallard was attacked last night.  She has some punctures and few feathers on her back.  She also has her right leg pulled up. How can I help her?
 
Posts: 68
Location: Lewis County, WA USDA Zone 8b
9
cat dog trees
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Can you bring her into your house?
 
Beth Johnson
Posts: 68
Location: Lewis County, WA USDA Zone 8b
9
cat dog trees
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Bring her into your house and take a good look at her - in the bathroom is probably best. Are there any blood feathers bleeding? If there's any bleeding use gauze or something without lint and apply pressure. Do you have Betadine or something similar? You can dilute it and dab it on broken skin.
 
Beth Johnson
Posts: 68
Location: Lewis County, WA USDA Zone 8b
9
cat dog trees
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Don't use peroxide - it kills healthy skin. Neosporin/triple antibiotic ointment is good to use once the wound is clean and dry. ummmmm...sorry for the multiple posts...stand by - I'm going to look at Storey's first aid section.
 
Posts: 83
Location: KY
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hugelkultur forest garden ungarbage
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Cleanliness while healing is important...bites are a terrible thing and get infected easily. Sometimes bite wounds need to be squeezed a bit, and kept open to prevent internal buildup of pus, etc. With my dogs, when they get a bite wound I always wash my hands before getting near the wound, and a combination of a warm soapy rag to keep the area clean and kind of work puss out, then dab with another rag with 70% rubbing alcohol...I only do that for a few days and have had good luck with minor wounds healing on their own.

If the wounds start to smell bad or look abnormally swollen/pussy then take it to a vet!

I'm no expert but I would think (like mentioned above) keeping the duck inside, like in your bathtub with frequent water changes would reduce risk of infection from the wounds. I hope the best for you and the duck!
 
Ty Greene
Posts: 83
Location: KY
19
hugelkultur forest garden ungarbage
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Yes that's right some light application of Neosporin does seem to help, but I wouldn't cake it in there, and clean and re-apply a couple times a day? Hopefully my advice is good...it's just what I have done and it worked out.
 
Beth Johnson
Posts: 68
Location: Lewis County, WA USDA Zone 8b
9
cat dog trees
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So much depends on the injuries, place, number, size.

Puncture wounds: How many? How deep? Where are they located? Do you have chickens? Ducks will pull out each others' feathers, but I'm not sure they can cause puncture wounds with their bills. But they can scratch up each other's backs with the little claws their feet. Mine decided to bum rush into a corner and tried to Yertle the Turtle each other, and the ones near the bottom lost back feather and had pin-prick bleeding dots. :(

This option is controversial - I used Blu Kote on their backs. Ducks can see in color, and I didn't want them to see red dots and think, "Looks tasty."

As far as her leg: if it's broken, you can splint it with tongue depressors, but I'd take care of wounds first.

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Blu-Kote Brigade
 
Beth Johnson
Posts: 68
Location: Lewis County, WA USDA Zone 8b
9
cat dog trees
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Oh - I see the subj changed. It was a predator attack.

Okay. Tighten up nighttime security. Get them in the duck house at dusk. I don't know where you live, but there are all sorts of nighttime predators in the city, suburbs and rural areas. Ecotone.

Try to identify what's attacking the ducks. Here's a website that might help: Poultry DVM Predator Identification

Sadly, the chance of losing a duck to predation is high, but happily, ducks tend to be pretty hardy and might recover even when things look dire.

Please let us know how you are in addition to your duck.

 
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