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Revised and Updated Plan for Heart of the Earth Farm

 
pollinator
Posts: 330
Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
75
forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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We have bought a farm on the Ohio side of the Ohio River. The mountains in the background of the attached picture are in Kentucky. We are not in the flood zone. The soil here is loamy loess. The only rock I have found on the property is the point of a spearhead. We have 2 acres, a small pond, persimmon tree, chestnut tree, a pear tree, and a old small dairy barn.

I do still plan to do the outdoor kitchen, but it is being put off for a bit.

I am converting the very small dairy barn into a sheep dairy barn, with grain and hay storage and the milking stanchion inside, and a leanto for straw being added on. We only plan to buy 2 East Friesian ewes. We are fencing in the pasture.

We put in a garden, but have low expectations of it. Next year's garden will be 6x the size of this one and will be transitioning to Ruth Stout method for vegetables. I am not yet sure how I want to do my grains (corn and possibly rye).

I am working on the well to get it running for irrigation. The general weather for this area is 3-4 wet years followed by a dry year.

The orchard is already started, but we are adding peaches, apples, cherries, and prickly ash. I am considering timber bamboo and tea at the end of the orchard that is near the pond.

The front of the house is a back to eden herb and edible flower garden on one side and a medicinal herbs back to eden garden on the other, seperated by a paved path to the mailbox. I am trying to convince my grandmother to let me put grapes between this herb garden and the street.

The pond area will have runner ducks eventually, but I have to catch all the snapping turtles first. Word is, they are a local delicasy.

We are doing chicken tractors next year, buff orpingtons for eggs, and red rangers for meat.

IMG_20190623_145807.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190623_145807.jpg]
I paid a guy to disk the garden plot. It was not plowed.
 
pollinator
Posts: 245
Location: Piedmont 7a
65
hugelkultur trees woodworking
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Looks like a nice spread, Ryan!  I have a hard time imagining no rocks since they are everywhere here - sounds quite luxurious!
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
Posts: 330
Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
75
forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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Artie Scott wrote:Looks like a nice spread, Ryan!  I have a hard time imagining no rocks since they are everywhere here - sounds quite luxurious!



I had to dig test holes two weeks ago. Shovel went into the ground like the soil was made of pancakes. In all the soil I have seen here, there are no rocks. Fast forward to a few days ago and we are pulling weeds in the flower bed and with some thistle roots came the largeish piece of a spearhead. The bottom is snapped clean off. It is a bit blunt. I think it broke in use and was retouched before breaking again and being discarded.
 
pollinator
Posts: 350
Location: Boudamasa, Chad
65
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Exciting stuff! I'll be following...

About the orchard: traditional orchard? Food forest? Back to Eden? Alley cropping? What's your plan for sustainable fertility in that sector?

Have fun!

 
Posts: 203
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
8
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hmm...I dare say the application of the Ruth Stout method on these 2 acres will require many large heaps of woodchips.
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
Posts: 330
Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
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forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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Nathanael Szobody wrote:Exciting stuff! I'll be following...

About the orchard: traditional orchard? Food forest? Back to Eden? Alley cropping? What's your plan for sustainable fertility in that sector?

Have fun!




Silvopasture. The chickens and sheep will graze there, and the leaf drop will not be moved.

Burl Smith wrote:hmm...I dare say the application of the Ruth Stout method on these 2 acres will require many large heaps of woodchips.



RSM uses straw.
 
Nathanael Szobody
pollinator
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Location: Boudamasa, Chad
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Ryan Hobbs wrote:

Nathanael Szobody wrote:Exciting stuff! I'll be following...

About the orchard: traditional orchard? Food forest? Back to Eden? Alley cropping? What's your plan for sustainable fertility in that sector?

Have fun!




Silvopasture. The chickens and sheep will graze there, and the leaf drop will not be moved.



Might I suggest adding support tree species among the fruit ones?
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
Posts: 330
Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
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forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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Nathanael Szobody wrote:

Ryan Hobbs wrote:

Nathanael Szobody wrote:Exciting stuff! I'll be following...

About the orchard: traditional orchard? Food forest? Back to Eden? Alley cropping? What's your plan for sustainable fertility in that sector?

Have fun!




Silvopasture. The chickens and sheep will graze there, and the leaf drop will not be moved.



Might I suggest adding support tree species among the fruit ones?



I was considering honey locust. It fixes nitrogen and has an edible seed pod and supports bees.
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
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Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
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forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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Okay, I gave this some more thought and changed my mind about the silvopasture.

Now it is going to be a food forest. I am moving the garden to higher ground, expanding the pasture into the current garden, and converting the silvopasture/orchard into a very diverse food forest.

Trees: apples, pears, persimmons, peaches, cherries, thornless honey locust, chinese chestnut, and prickly mountain ash.
Shrubs: blueberry, blackberry, camelia, lingonberry, viburnum
Vines: hardy kiwi, grapes
Groundcover: strawberries and cucurbitae, spreading and mounding herbs
Nitrogen fixing: pole beans, illinois bunchflower, clover
Bioaccumulators: mustard, asparagus, comfrey, sunflower
Barrier plants: hardy orange
Insect attractants: tobacco, goldenrod, vibernum, sage family, carrot family


Edited to add: the hardy orange is a barrier to mosquitos and deer. The bunchflower is also a hay crop and useful medicinally to remedy addiction according to its traditional use in combination with Nicotiana rustica as a smoked herb.
 
Nathanael Szobody
pollinator
Posts: 350
Location: Boudamasa, Chad
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Ryan Hobbs wrote:Okay, I gave this some more thought and changed my mind about the silvopasture.

Now it is going to be a food forest. I am moving the garden to higher ground, expanding the pasture into the current garden, and converting the silvopasture/orchard into a very diverse food forest.

Trees: apples, pears, persimmons, peaches, cherries, thornless honey locust, chinese chestnut, and prickly mountain ash.
Shrubs: blueberry, blackberry, camelia, lingonberry, viburnum
Vines: hardy kiwi, grapes
Groundcover: strawberries and cucurbitae, spreading and mounding herbs
Nitrogen fixing: pole beans, illinois bunchflower, clover
Bioaccumulators: mustard, asparagus, comfrey, sunflower
Barrier plants: hardy orange
Insect attractants: tobacco, goldenrod, vibernum, sage family, carrot family


Edited to add: the hardy orange is a barrier to mosquitos and deer. The bunchflower is also a hay crop and useful medicinally to remedy addiction according to its traditional use in combination with Nicotiana rustica as a smoked herb.



Woohoo! Now you're talking! A great addition to the"vine" category would be wild rosehips. They're so delicious in the late fall and early winter and packed with vitamin C (and other good stuff). They also produce copiously on complete neglect. Partial shade is fine.
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
Posts: 330
Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
75
forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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Nathanael Szobody wrote:Woohoo! Now you're talking! A great addition to the"vine" category would be wild rosehips. They're so delicious in the late fall and early winter and packed with vitamin C (and other good stuff). They also produce copiously on complete neglect. Partial shade is fine.



I was thinking of jujubes for the same reason, but they are a tree, not a vine. I only have a half acre tho.
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
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Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
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forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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::UPDATE::

the food forest guild has been updated to 12 layers and 45 species. I didn't set out to create new layers, but found that some of the categories needed split up. I will post the full list tomorrow if I remember.
 
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Nice idea! )))))))))
 
Ryan Hobbs
pollinator
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Location: Scioto county, Ohio, USA
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forest garden hunting cooking food preservation sheep homestead
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The Food forest will transition to food prairie on one side and aquatic on the other, so all three are listed together.

Chestnut, pear, and persimmon trees are already present.

::Dominant Species::
Apples
Peaches
Cherries
Prickly Mountain Ash
Hardy Giant Pecan
(Note, other trees located under different headings)

::Soil Busters::
Daikon
Mandrake

::Living Mulch::
Summer Squash
Winter Squash
Cucumbers
Melons
Strawberries

::Insectaries::
Culinary Sage
Russian Sage
White Sage
Corriander
Thyme
Oregano
Nicotiana rustica
Goldenrod
Honey Locust

::Shrubs::
Thornless Raspberry
High Bush Blueberry
Camelia japonica
Lingonberry
Pawpaw
Viburnum

::Bioaccumulators::
Asparagus
Mustard
Comfrey
Sunflowers
Mushrooms

::Nitrogen Fixers::
Illinois Bunchflower
Honey locust
Pole beans
Clover

::Climbers::
Grapes
Hardy Kiwi
Morning Glories

::Barrier Plants::
Hardy Orange
Citronella Geranium

::Rhizosphere::
Potatoes
Garlic
Fennel
Onions
Leeks
Wild Alliums
Ginseng
Turmeric
Beets

::Tall Grasses::
Sorghum
Winter Rye

::Aquatic Plants::
Sacred Lotus
Rice
 
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