• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Rob Lineberger
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Ash Jackson
  • Jordan Holland

Need fast growing, drought resistant dynamic accumulators in the tropics

 
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in a deserted, dry (when it's not rainy season) windy, deforested part of Haiti, trying to get a food forest going. I need suggestions on fast growing dynamic accumulators for chop and drop. If I can't get them locally, I'll need a source of seeds. Looking for Mexican Sunflower, but having a problem finding seed.
 
Posts: 492
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We have Japanese Knotweed along the river banks. It tolerates some shade and is a forage for goats. I have had less trouble with it so far than with Jerusalem Artichokes volunteering in the potato patch and I treat it the same, dig up the root and knock it back with the weedeater. I have used the stalks for mulch between raised beds.
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Burl Smith wrote:We have Japanese Knotweed along the river banks. It tolerates some shade and is a forage for goats. I have had less trouble with it so far than with Jerusalem Artichokes volunteering in the potato patch and I treat it the same, dig up the root and knock it back with the weedeater. I have used the stalks for mulch between raised beds.



I haven't heard of that one. Does it grow easily from seed? And is it drought resistant? We get pretty hot and dry and windy here in the dry seasons. I might be able to plant it into my swales to hold the banks. I'm going to be getting a bunch of vetiver for that too.
 
Burl Smith
Posts: 492
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In most circles the mere mention of knotweed is enough to raise the hackles of even the lenient cultivator, but it might be serviceable in your situation.
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Burl Smith wrote:In most circles the mere mention of knotweed is enough to raise the hackles of even the lenient cultivator, but it might be serviceable in your situation.



I'll do some investigating. Thanks!
 
pollinator
Posts: 11802
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1051
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am growing Moringa for the first time this year and I am thrilled.  My trees planted as seed this spring are over 8 feet tall and have already been cut back once.  This is called a miracle tree and I believe it.  Needs water when a young tree but is drought tolerant when mature.

This is a great resource for all kinds of amazing tropical seeds, including Moringa:  http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/

They have the annual form of Mexican Sunflower but not the perennial.
 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tyler Ludens wrote:I am growing Moringa for the first time this year and I am thrilled.  My trees planted as seed this spring are over 8 feet tall and have already been cut back once.  This is called a miracle tree and I believe it.  Needs water when a young tree but is drought tolerant when mature.

This is a great resource for all kinds of amazing tropical seeds, including Moringa:  http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/

They have the annual form of Mexican Sunflower but not the perennial.



Did you direct sow the seeds? We have lots of moringa around that I can access. I put some cuttings into the ground to see if they take root. I'll need to plant a ton of them to give them a chance to outrun the goats! Not sure if it's best to plant them direct so they get right into the ground and start rooting, or start them in sacks in a sheltered area. I'm concerned that transplant shock will negate any benefit. I've got a good slingshot on it's way so I can shoot the goats away, but I can't be watching every minute. Ha

I should have unlimited seeds pretty much.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 11802
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
1051
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We have deer here the way you have goats there, and we can't grow much of anything unless it is inside a fence or protected by a large brush pile.  The goats will definitely want to eat the Moringa, so you may have to put little fences around them.

Some of mine were direct seeded, some transplanted.  Some of the transplants died, but the ones which lived, I can't tell them from the direct-seeded ones.  I'm also trying a cutting.  Too early to see if it will take.

 
Priscilla Stilwell
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
28
forest garden rabbit greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tyler Ludens wrote:We have deer here the way you have goats there, and we can't grow much of anything unless it is inside a fence or protected by a large brush pile.  The goats will definitely want to eat the Moringa, so you may have to put little fences around them.

Some of mine were direct seeded, some transplanted.  Some of the transplants died, but the ones which lived, I can't tell them from the direct-seeded ones.  I'm also trying a cutting.  Too early to see if it will take.



Yeah. Not sure how doable fencing them will be. I'm looking at planting about a foot apart in large swaths. The goats can't eat everything! Then I'll cut them out to thin as they grow. But mostly I'll just chop, drop, and let grow again.

We are looking into getting a wall around campus, but that will take some time.
 
Don't count your weasels before they've popped. And now for a mulberry bush related tiny ad:
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic