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Where to spread your ashes

 
Posts: 122
Location: Eastern Ontario
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If you, like I do, roughly plan out where you are going to plant next years veggies, where do you spread your ashes?  Which crops like ashes?
I spread mine over where Ill plant aliums; brassicas;  root crops like carrots, parsnip, beets and potatoes.  I think legumes like ashes too.  How about you? Any that I missed? Any that should nt get ash treatment? I dont YET have blueberries and I know not to put ashes on them!

Come to think about it geeze where dont I put my ashes? The crops that I dont fertilize with ash are the squashes, leaffy veggies, and corn but if Ive still got ashes Ill spread them there too. I rotate my crops around so even these should get lots of phosphorus, potassium and calcium left over from previous crops.


I burn 4 full cords of wood each year so I can afford to be generous with my ashes.  What prompted this post is reading that potatoes prefer acidic soil but when harvesting potatoes last weekend I saw that where there was loads of ash the potatoes were spectacular.

Writing this has made me realize that what I should do is rake up bags of pine needles and mulch where the potatoes will go then apply ashes.  I'll have very very happy potatoes.

I had terrible slug problem this year. So I am going to save some ashes and all my crushed egg shells and spread them around my cabbages and tomotoes during the growing season.  Should make those beds minefields of death for the little slimey buggers.
 
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Ash is alkaline. Only things I won’t put ash on are blueberries and other acid loving plants. Lots of people here grow blueberries and everyone that puts ash on it seem to lose their bushes. It is a really sad thing to see. Ash for all the regular garden beds works great for me as my soil is naturally a bit on the acidic side.
 
pollinator
Posts: 241
Location: Monticello Florida
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"Where to spread you ashes,"   my brain: "that's a tough question, probably on a mountain top or someplace cool like that." πŸ˜„πŸ˜„πŸ˜„
 
pollinator
Posts: 1338
Location: Victoria BC
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Huxley Harter wrote:"Where to spread you ashes,"   my brain: "that's a tough question, probably on a mountain top or someplace cool like that." πŸ˜„πŸ˜„πŸ˜„



Mine went someone different too, before I realized that the saying I was thinking of was about wild oats, not ashes!
 
Tick check! Okay, I guess that was just an itch. Oh wait! Just a tiny ad:
5 Ways to Transform Your Garden into a Low Water Garden
https://permies.com/t/97045/Reduce-garden-watering
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