Win a copy of Bioshelter Market Garden this week in the Market Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

What mystery bee in my bee home?

 
Posts: 13
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
5
kids forest garden bee
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A few years ago I made some mason bee homes. It didn't work out that well and I ended up storing the trays in my barn. Some where neatly stacked, some weren't. This fall I noticed that some of the holes were covered over. Someone had decided to call it home! I was curious what species it might be. Adding to the intrigue is that some of the nest holes that were used were only "half" a hole (I routered channels in my trays but they only form a full tube when stacked together, these trays against a flat surface).

Can anyone identify these cocoons?
I can't tell if it's either an immature mason bee, or a mature resin bee. The larvae itself looks like a resin bee but the cell dividers are mud instead of resin. I know a mature mason bee would be fully encased in a cocoon which is not the case here, maybe just too early in it's development?

In terms of climate; I'm in New Brunswick, Canada. Zone 4. Daily overnight frost now with first snow forecast for the weekend.

I'm really torn, because I've I heard the resin bee is invasive in which case I should consider destroying them. But if it's a mason bee I want to save them!
unknown-bee-larvae.jpg
What mystery bee in my bee home?
What mystery bee in my bee home?
 
gardener
Posts: 2276
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
303
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Glenn;
I am far from a bee person, but those look like "mud dauber" nests. Wasps!
If so I recommend destroying them.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11433
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
765
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree with the Mud Dauber.

 
Glenn Van Agten
Posts: 13
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
5
kids forest garden bee
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the quick replies. I read up on mud daubers, seems they like to eat spiders. My barn is loaded with spiders so it seems even more likely that mud daubers would nest there.
 
gardener
Posts: 6345
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1085
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those don't really look like they were made by "mud dauber" wasps to me.

They do look like mason bees or possibly carpenter bees.

Mud daubers like to create their own mud tunnels for their offspring to grow up in and they put food critters in with their eggs.

Redhawk
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
Posts: 11433
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
765
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can you tell what kind of food was put in with the larvae?  Was it pollen (now mostly eaten) or spiders, or?

 
Glenn Van Agten
Posts: 13
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
5
kids forest garden bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I looked again to check for evidence of food and found none. The cells are very clean, just filled with fat larvae. Whatever they had, they must have eaten.
E0155A22-EB1D-415B-A07B-216D35746319.jpeg
What mystery bee in my bee home?
What mystery bee in my bee home?
 
Posts: 556
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
153
transportation hugelkultur cat forest garden fish trees urban chicken cooking woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

If you're concerned at possibility killing the 'good bees' or keeping 'the bad bees', how about netting the motel so when they emerge you can easily assess them before release?

I assume, in that cold climate, the bees/wasps are now inactive till Spring, so it shouldn't stop new arrivals I.e. In our climate, they're coming and going like a Hilton Hotel, so it would be a bit disruptive.

 
I want my playground back. Here, I'll give you this tiny ad for it:
A rocket mass heater heats your home with one tenth the wood of a conventional wood stove
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!