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searching for a Sawyer with Alaskan Mill, SE USA

 
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I have a large fallen oak suitable for milling but its location means we couldn't get it on a truck to the mill, nor can we get a large enough Woodmizer portable mill to it, so I'm looking for a sawyer with an alaskan mill to do the job so we can stack and store it onsite until needed. Top of tree is removed, remaining is trunk (~33"diam.) roots and large limb
I've tried woodmizer pro, craigslist, YP and fakebook 'mudbuilders of atlanta' forum.
Any leads appreciated.
Also maybe there's a better forum on Permies to post this?
 
pollinator
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I would try calling local arborists. A couple of the ones around here also have alaskan mills as side gigs, and even if none do in your area, they may have a lead.

Ditto stationary sawmill guys.
 
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I added this to a few other forums, Gear, Southern US and Roundwood and Timer Framing. Gets the attention of people who might know who you can call...
Good luck, sorry I'm otherwise useless, Have no mill, not in your area :D
 
Steven Lindsay
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Thank you so much Pearl! I wasn't sure where to put it once I found nothing in my forum search.
 
Steven Lindsay
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D Nikolls wrote:I would try calling local arborists. A couple of the ones around here also have alaskan mills as side gigs, and even if none do in your area, they may have a lead.

Ditto stationary sawmill guys.


Thanks D, I've done the rounds. It was local arborists that quoted originally and took away the top half (they could only offer to cut it up into wheels), and I've contacted every mill and sawyer I could find within an hours drive. I had a mill and craftsman lined up to do 4" slabs but my neighbor wasn't willing to allow the necessary access to get the trunk out whole.
 
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you could probably rent a big chainsaw and huztl sells alaskan mill clones pretty cheap
 
Steven Lindsay
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bruce Fine wrote:you could probably rent a big chainsaw and huztl sells alaskan mill clones pretty cheap


Thanks, but my hands aren't the best, wouldn't risk it. Happy to pay someone with skill and experience.
hands.jpg
hands
hands
 
D Nikolls
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Steven Lindsay wrote:

D Nikolls wrote:I would try calling local arborists. A couple of the ones around here also have alaskan mills as side gigs, and even if none do in your area, they may have a lead.

Ditto stationary sawmill guys.


Thanks D, I've done the rounds. It was local arborists that quoted originally and took away the top half (they could only offer to cut it up into wheels), and I've contacted every mill and sawyer I could find within an hours drive. I had a mill and craftsman lined up to do 4" slabs but my neighbor wasn't willing to allow the necessary access to get the trunk out whole.



Wow, amazed nobody could even point you the right direction.

Hm.

You've probably already beat your head against it from this angle too, but what about dragging it to vehicle access in shorter chunks with a chainsaw winch?

Might be the sort of job you could do with the help of an oddjob-for-hire type craigslist worker..

 
Steven Lindsay
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Thanks D,
I guess we're a bit too far from Alaska!
I'll keep putting the word out. Your idea is similar to my original, but only feasible if the neighbor allowed it, which would have been pretty straightforward when the fence was down whilst removing the top half of the tree, but, no-go. Worst comes to worst I'll make LOTS of wheels, some seats, tables, picnic benches... maybe a Barney Rubble car...

D Nikolls wrote:

Steven Lindsay wrote:

D Nikolls wrote:I would try calling local arborists. A couple of the ones around here also have alaskan mills as side gigs, and even if none do in your area, they may have a lead.

Ditto stationary sawmill guys.


Thanks D, I've done the rounds. It was local arborists that quoted originally and took away the top half (they could only offer to cut it up into wheels), and I've contacted every mill and sawyer I could find within an hours drive. I had a mill and craftsman lined up to do 4" slabs but my neighbor wasn't willing to allow the necessary access to get the trunk out whole.



Wow, amazed nobody could even point you the right direction.

Hm.

You've probably already beat your head against it from this angle too, but what about dragging it to vehicle access in shorter chunks with a chainsaw winch?

Might be the sort of job you could do with the help of an oddjob-for-hire type craigslist worker..

 
D Nikolls
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Steven Lindsay wrote:Thanks D,
I guess we're a bit too far from Alaska!
I'll keep putting the word out. Your idea is similar to my original, but only feasible if the neighbor allowed it, which would have been pretty straightforward when the fence was down whilst removing the top half of the tree, but, no-go. Worst comes to worst I'll make LOTS of wheels, some seats, tables, picnic benches... maybe a Barney Rubble car...

D Nikolls wrote:

Steven Lindsay wrote:

D Nikolls wrote:I would try calling local arborists. A couple of the ones around here also have alaskan mills as side gigs, and even if none do in your area, they may have a lead.

Ditto stationary sawmill guys.


Thanks D, I've done the rounds. It was local arborists that quoted originally and took away the top half (they could only offer to cut it up into wheels), and I've contacted every mill and sawyer I could find within an hours drive. I had a mill and craftsman lined up to do 4" slabs but my neighbor wasn't willing to allow the necessary access to get the trunk out whole.



Wow, amazed nobody could even point you the right direction.

Hm.

You've probably already beat your head against it from this angle too, but what about dragging it to vehicle access in shorter chunks with a chainsaw winch?

Might be the sort of job you could do with the help of an oddjob-for-hire type craigslist worker..



Rats.. your neighour sounds like rather a Contrary Unhelpful Nasty Type.

You could try a post like this one on forestryforum.com and arboristsite.com, might get lucky.

Barring that... well, as you say, endless side tables, stools, etc. Maybe some really big coasters!
 
pollinator
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Just because you are running out of options, I propose an unconventional solution....

In World War I, they had the same issue as you did. They needed to get big trees out of the woods, and had small equipment. In this case it was trucks because they had to move from tree to tree to tree, and could not clear cut which is what they were used to doing. But the trucks could not get huge logs out of the woods, this was 1918 remember. So they rived them...that is they split the logs into quarters.

I am not sure if this would help, but maybe being 1/4 the size would mean you could get the log out? In your case it would be in long lengths, yet because it is an Oak log, you would have the wood quarter-sawn, the best way to saw that wood anyway. And for you, Oak splits very easily! It also can be done with hand tools you probably already have on hand...wedges, mauls and jacks. Maybe being 1/4 of the size, you could get them out?

If you want more information on riving wood, you can look up "Spruce Production Division". This was a military operation because they needed Sitka Spruce, the lightest weight to strength wood there is, in order for planes of their day to be made for World War One.

 
Steven Lindsay
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Thanks Travis, I'll keep that in mind. I remember helping my dad split some long logs when I was a kid using steel wedges.
I've already gotten one response via Forestry forum. Wish me luck!...

Travis Johnson wrote:Just because you are running out of options, I propose an unconventional solution....

...

 
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