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Best plants for flavor, production in urban area

 
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What are your best plants in an urban area for flavor and production?  I find them to be different.

Maybe Vera can help us on this one.

I get more poundage from quince and Asian pears by tree than apples, but I actually eat all of the apples.  That's partially because I can grow the varieties that I like the best and there are several that store very well all winter.

For flavor, I would say probably pie cherries, because they are so flavorful and it is so hard to find organic pie cherries.  My biochar really kicked them into gear too. Second for me would probably be American persimmons for exactly the same reasons.

What are yours?

John S
PDX OR

 
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I like to grow Asian Pears, Asian Persimmons, Jujube, Muscadine, Raspberry.  I am working on Kiwi and Pawpaw, Fig and several Pluots and Plums.
All on 0.65 acres.
 
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Black-cap raspberries (the feral sort) are very flavorful, and productive even in somewhat shady parts of my yard. You don't need much space to get a lot of fruit, we have a half-dozen canes around the edges of the yard, and in season it is more than my family can consume fresh from day-to-day, so plenty to freeze or can. They are not bothered by pests or disease. You do need to prune them to keep the "whip" ends from rooting and taking over the yard, though.

Redcurrants likewise are very productive and flavorful, thought they are very tart so better for drinks/jellies/baking than straight eating in my opinion. Very easy to grow for a fruit that is so expensive at the markets. They propagate easily and do sprawl if not pruned, but do not spread aggressively like the black-caps.

Rhubarb is an attractive plant that needs little care to come up year after year, just split it up like you would a hosta every so often.

Concord-type grapes produce a lot of fruit all at once, probably the greats pound-per-square-foot of anything it the yard. However, they are bothered by fruit flies and fungus, which reduces the actual usable harvest substantially. They also really like my neighbors' side of the fence more than mine, and they are not so keen on the fruit.
 
John Suavecito
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Black cap raspberries are hard to find and an absolute powerhouse against cancer, especially oral cancer.  PLus they taste good, particularly in jams.

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/black-raspberries-versus-oral-cancer/

Concord grapes are another nutritional and flavor powerhouse. The leaves are vegetables, too.  I agree with rhubarb-lots of a particular food for a small space.

John S
PDX OR
 
Mk Neal
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Interesting about the effect on cancer. Black-Cap raspberries have always been one of my favorites, I was happy they showed up in my yard. They are pretty much naturalized in the upper Midwest, I would say. Tend to find them at the edges of forest and disturbed ground.
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