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How do coconut trees grow in Florida (not the Florida keys)

 
Posts: 39
Location: Murrieta, CA, Zone 9b/10a
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I've heard that coconut trees will die at temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, yet they grow everywhere in south and central Florida, where it is hardiness zones 9b, 10a, and 10b. If the internet is correct, the Florida keys would be the only place in Florida where the coconut palms will grow. could someone explain how this works?
 
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Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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If you watch these trees for a few years you might notice they do not put out coconut fruits.
There are also the date palms, (look a lot like coconut palms) which is what most cities that have palms along boulevards have planted instead of the coconut palms. Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego and others have planted date palms along their main streets.
 
Samuel Palmer
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Location: Murrieta, CA, Zone 9b/10a
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:If you watch these trees for a few years you might notice they do not put out coconut fruits.
There are also the date palms, (look a lot like coconut palms) which is what most cities that have palms along boulevards have planted instead of the coconut palms. Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego and others have planted date palms along their main streets.


I think you mean queen palms, king palms, and other coconut palm looking trees. Date palms don't look like coconut palms at all, I've seen then growing everywhere. Besides, the palm trees in Los Angeles that your thinking about are probably Californian and Mexican fan palms.
 
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Coconut trees definitely thrive and bear fruit year round in south Florida.  They have been here since at least 1878 when a ship carrying coconuts crashed off the coast of palm beach, and early settlers collected and planted them. They thrive along the coast from vero beach south on the east side and st pete on the west side, and inland along the border of 9b/10a and south, and in isolated microclimates farther north. The hard part is getting them to maturity in the marginal areas, because they are much more sensitive while young. Mature coconuts can handle very brief dips to 26-28, with minor damage. Young coconuts can die at 32, and if conditions are under 40 and wet for extended periods  of time, which isnt really south Florida weather. I think they thrive better and grow faster when planted in place as a seed. Please note these are just my observations, but I feel if you live in florida, you should try to grow them.
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