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Permanent garden bed in greenhouse that's wood

 
pollinator
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Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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So I plan to put a permanent bed at the front of the greenhouse where I will plant tomatoes, peppers and melons. I'm wondering about what I should do as far as rot prevention. I feel like having a garden bed right up against the greenhouse wall that is watered and mulched and such is going to increase the chance of my walls rotting by a lot. Any advice?
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gardener
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Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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looks like maybe douglas fir by the colour of that grain.  And that's good, because it is relatively rot-resistant, but having two X fours directly on the sod is not going to bode well on boosting that, nor is the addition of living soil/mulch/water going to help the situation.  Not sure what to say, considering that the structure is already up.  I might have suggested raising it up on stone.    Might be worth putting it up on something at any rate.  You could put some wood underneath all your walls to raise it up.  The wood would be sacrificial towards rotting, and then replace it down the road, saving your framing/window supports.
 
elle sagenev
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:looks like maybe douglas fir by the colour of that grain.  And that's good, because it is relatively rot-resistant, but having two X fours directly on the sod is not going to bode well on boosting that, nor is the addition of living soil/mulch/water going to help the situation.  Not sure what to say, considering that the structure is already up.  I might have suggested raising it up on stone.    Might be worth putting it up on something at any rate.  You could put some wood underneath all your walls to raise it up.  The wood would be sacrificial towards rotting, and then replace it down the road, saving your framing/window supports.



I did honestly consider sticking it up on blocks but I am not a great builder and this is the extent of what I felt competent doing.

Would it make a difference if I put bricks or blocks or some sort of material between the wood wall and the garden bed?
 
Roberto pokachinni
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looks like a pretty solid structure.

anything that you put between rot prone material and the sources of rot would be beneficial to some extent, but if you don't pick that structure off the ground, the moisture from the bed will be wicked toward the dry outer area, especially in your windy location... in that case it will draw the moisture towards your frame, under whatever you put there...  I'm not sure what is best in that regard, Elle, perhaps a little drainage ditch on the inside of your wall to keep that moisture below and away from the wood?  or just line the inside with sacrificial wood... ?
 
elle sagenev
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:looks like a pretty solid structure.

anything that you put between rot prone material and the sources of rot would be beneficial to some extent, but if you don't pick that structure off the ground, the moisture from the bed will be wicked toward the dry outer area, especially in your windy location... in that case it will draw the moisture towards your frame, under whatever you put there...  I'm not sure what is best in that regard, Elle, perhaps a little drainage ditch on the inside of your wall to keep that moisture below and away from the wood?  or just line the inside with sacrificial wood... ?



What if I trench and put rock directly under the wall boards? I think I could do that this spring while the ground is soft. I could also potentially use rubber liner stapled to the boards. I'll discuss both options with my spouse and see what he thinks.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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those would be good options, I'd say.  Both would be insurance.
 
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