• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Greg Martin

Window greenhouse is coming along.

 
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've got all the windows and doors in. Though the doors need adjusting to fit properly. Now to frame the roof and sheet metal all exposed parts. Still so far to go!

Oh and the windows are filthy. At some point I'll have my babes out there with a hose and a scrubby washing them up.

Most of the windows are from our house. Some were given to me by people and I have a massive amount of ancient wood windows from my work. I used a few of them but because of the need to keep them painted so they don't rot I decided against using all wood windows.

Yes I know some of the windows are crooked. Some of them got jammed in the frame and I couldn't get them to budge. So screw it, screwed em in. That's how I roll, yo. Others, windows that were given to me, were cut out of their original location with a reciprocating saw and so the frames had parts that stuck out more here than there and yeah. I'll fill the gaps, I don't care if it's crooked, I think it adds charm.

I had a lot of family help. Hubs had to help me dig and lift most things thanks to being pregs. Kids hopped in and out to do things as they wanted. Son did help me staple windows on. Using a staple gun is fun, after all.

Kept the old stairs from the front of our house to use as shelves in the greenhouse. Happy I did! They're very well built.
69237802_10157445679753633_1263840675703554048_n.jpg
[Thumbnail for 69237802_10157445679753633_1263840675703554048_n.jpg]
69146756_10157445680003633_2477964442076184576_n.jpg
[Thumbnail for 69146756_10157445680003633_2477964442076184576_n.jpg]
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I fully expect to be delayed in sheet metaling the thing. It's been WINDY lately. It's pretty early for this much wind, imo. Putting the windows in was tricky with it. So I've asked hubs to begin moving the metal into the greenhouse area if and when it isn't windy. I'll do the roof first. After that the window wall should block a lot of the wind from the back wall and sheet metaling that should be easier. I'm just nervous about having enough sheet metal at this point. It was all given to us by someone who had it replaced due to hail damage. So it's got dings, free is free!
 
steward
Posts: 4776
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
1295
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cool use of materials Elle!  Is the north side going to be solid or windows?  
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Jay wrote:Cool use of materials Elle!  Is the north side going to be solid or windows?  



North, South and west facing are windows and doors. East facing is going to be a solid wall. The greenhouse is dug "crooked" so it will get a lot of south west sun.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 3624
824
transportation cat duck trees rabbit books chicken woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have you considered earth-berming your North wall as well? I know you have an excavator and could move the dirt easily! (And I know how much you like digging with said excavator).

 
Mike Jay
steward
Posts: 4776
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
1295
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You may want to consider not having windows on the North side.  Typically you'll lose more light out the north side than you'll gain.  All winter for sure.  So you could insulate that side instead and keep it a bit warmer.  Just a thought.

I'd only earth berm it if you designed the wall to handle that kind of pressure from the side.  
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Jay wrote:You may want to consider not having windows on the North side.  Typically you'll lose more light out the north side than you'll gain.  All winter for sure.  So you could insulate that side instead and keep it a bit warmer.  Just a thought.

I'd only earth berm it if you designed the wall to handle that kind of pressure from the side.  



The north wall is small and includes a door (it's the wall in the picture of the inside of the greenhouse). My dimensions are 8' wide x 24' long. So it's only 8' on the north side. I believe I'll need the door on that side for air flow in the summer. If you think it would be better to remove those windows on that wall I could easily do so and side the whole thing.
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Travis Johnson wrote:Have you considered earth-berming your North wall as well? I know you have an excavator and could move the dirt easily! (And I know how much you like digging with said excavator).



An interesting idea and I do love to dig. Unfortunately I didn't plan for that and the fence for the yard is pretty close behind the greenhouse. I don't think I could get either tractor into the space.
 
Mike Jay
steward
Posts: 4776
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
1295
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh, gotcha, I didn't realize that was the north side.  The shadows made it seem like the east.  

It's much less critical then if it has a window or not.  One window vs insulation is minor when compared to a 24' wall of the same.
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So the windows were cleaned and that looks nice. The roof is done, though you can't see that in the attached pic. The back wall is nearly done. I need to cut the last two pieces of metal down to finish that. Then it's just the front and sides and those are going to be the worst parts as they'll require the most cutting.
69698099_10157466121423633_4808960283013808128_o.jpg
[Thumbnail for 69698099_10157466121423633_4808960283013808128_o.jpg]
Most recent pic but the roof is done now.
69843682_10157459796003633_5991016161402159104_n.jpg
[Thumbnail for 69843682_10157459796003633_5991016161402159104_n.jpg]
Cleaning kids
69886401_10157459796108633_2191096532629979136_n.jpg
[Thumbnail for 69886401_10157459796108633_2191096532629979136_n.jpg]
Windows look much better!
69364300_10157459796298633_6780516972443467776_n.jpg
[Thumbnail for 69364300_10157459796298633_6780516972443467776_n.jpg]
Kids are less clean.
 
pioneer
Posts: 137
Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
19
transportation hugelkultur cat books cooking food preservation bike building writing rocket stoves wood heat
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you turn a standard circular saw blade around 'backwards' in your skillsaw, you can cut through tin roofing very quickly and accurately.
Wear eye protection!
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Chris Sturgeon wrote:If you turn a standard circular saw blade around 'backwards' in your skillsaw, you can cut through tin roofing very quickly and accurately.
Wear eye protection!



I did not realize that. I bought a metal cutting blade for it though. It works ok. I find if I tighten the blades on too tight it breaks them. Alternatively if I don't put them on tight enough they spin. oyza
 
Mike Jay
steward
Posts: 4776
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
1295
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Chris Sturgeon wrote:If you turn a standard circular saw blade around 'backwards' in your skillsaw, you can cut through tin roofing very quickly and accurately.
Wear eye protection!


If it's glavanized and painted steel roofing (like they sell at Menards) they say it voids the warrantee to cut it this way.  Something about how it burns the paint and allows the edge to rust quicker.  It will definitely cut it quickly though and in your drier climate, maybe it wouldn't be a problem.
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Jay wrote:

Chris Sturgeon wrote:If you turn a standard circular saw blade around 'backwards' in your skillsaw, you can cut through tin roofing very quickly and accurately.
Wear eye protection!


If it's glavanized and painted steel roofing (like they sell at Menards) they say it voids the warrantee to cut it this way.  Something about how it burns the paint and allows the edge to rust quicker.  It will definitely cut it quickly though and in your drier climate, maybe it wouldn't be a problem.



All my metal is used anyway. Super hail damaged but perfectly acceptable to me!
 
gardener
Posts: 2440
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
163
forest garden trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It looks marvelous!
Any plans to insulate the wall or floor?
I really want to make cardboard insulation work in my greenhouse, but foam is cheep,sometimes free,  and water resistant.

 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1913
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
145
kids duck forest garden chicken pig bee greening the desert homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

William Bronson wrote:It looks marvelous!
Any plans to insulate the wall or floor?
I really want to make cardboard insulation work in my greenhouse, but foam is cheep,sometimes free,  and water resistant.



I don't know if I will insulate it. I have some barrels I might put water in and locate on the back wall for heat sink/release. This will mostly be a spring/summer/fall greenhouse to extend my season and help with plant starting. I guess time will tell if I decide to make it more than that. Though with an excavator if I ever decide to grow things year round I imagine I'll do an underground greenhouse.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!