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Saving seeds from purchased ORGANIC tomatoes

 
Posts: 33
Location: USDA Zone 8a, Middle Georgia
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Has anyone successfully grown tomatoes from seed saved from purchased ORGANIC tomatoes?  I'm emphasizing ORGANIC because I have read lots about the downside of using treated grocery store produce for saving seed.  But I have not yet read anything about successful yields using ORGANIC produce.  
Thanks in advance for any helpful tips!
 
pollinator
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Location: Victoria BC
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I have had few issues growing seeds from store tomatoes, whether marked organic or not.

Sometimes, if they were a hybrid, they do not turn out great. I have had one type that was a spitter by the 2nd year. But this has nothing to do with whether the original fruit was grown organic, uncertified but organic style, or bathed in chemicals...


The ideal is known heritage cultivars.. but the lovely greenhouse operation near my parents grows a huge variety of tomatoes in all colours and sizes... and if you ask what a given one is? They will invariably tell you 'heritage!'.
 
pollinator
Posts: 628
Location: Montana
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To save seed from a tomato just scoop out some seeds and ferment them for a few days. Then rinse clean in a strainer, dry them out, and put then away for next year. Some people just stick a few seeds to paper.

If it's planting time there are some fun options. You can plant a tomato slice for instance. You can also scoop the seeds out and plant them. They'll ferment right there in the potting soil and then sprout.

Locally grown organic tomatoes are probably a good place to start anywhere. Though one caveat, some growers have very nice greenhouses and season extension. They may grow some very long season varieties.

If you live in a nice long season area probably any tomato will work. Your profile says middle Georgia and that may fit the bill.

If the tomato is sold as a named variety you can look it up.

There is really no difference between saving seed from a purchased tomato and saving seed from one you grew.

You could also save seed from feral tomatoes you find, dumpster dived tomatoes, or any uncooked tomato you encounter- you could pick a fresh tomato seed out of a sandwich. I sometimes see feral tomatoes where someone probably stopped and ate their lunch.

If it is a hybrid think of saving it's seed as a breeding project.

That said, it sure is nice to have nice well selected tomato varieties when I spend six months growing them. Do you have any tomato disease problems?  
 
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organic does not mean heirloom or open pollinated , but why not try it and see what comes out of it
 
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I had success growing store tomatoes.  I sliced them into sections and buried them slightly in the dirt.  They came up thickly and I was able to transplant them to another spot.  Ideally I would plant them where I want them to grow.
 
Denise Massey
Posts: 33
Location: USDA Zone 8a, Middle Georgia
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William Schelegal the only constant problems I have with my tomatoes are intense summer heat and the dreaded tomato horn worm.  
 
William Schlegel
pollinator
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Denise Massey wrote: William Schelegal the only constant problems I have with my tomatoes are intense summer heat and the dreaded tomato horn worm.  



Hmm, I have neither of those problems in Montana. Well maybe it does get too hot for awhile some years even here.  I think there might be some varieties that do better than others with the heat. Not sure if any tomato horn worm resistant strains exist yet or not. I reckon if you just want to try some varieties given your long growing season and modest number of problems that the organic tomato section is as good a source of seed as any. Tomatoes have lots of seeds in them and after you pick out the seeds you can eat the vast majority of the tomato. Probably cheaper than buying seed packets and tomatoes. If some particular plants you end up growing do extra well for you  by any measure you prefer save seeds from them. So good luck!
 
I've read about this kind of thing at the checkout counter. That's where I met this tiny ad:
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https://permies.com/t/143525/videos/Abundance-Dry-Land-documentary-streaming
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