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Forest Garden Tour

 
Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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In this video we look at two apple tree guilds, a cherry tree guild, pine tree guild, and a few vegetable patches along the way.



 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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Thanks for posting!
 
Mike Underhill
Posts: 53
Location: N. Sac. Valley
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Nice, thanks for showing us around. I'm gonna guess that the pine needle drop has made the soil around the grape plant acidic, so you may have to continually treat with lime to balance the pH.
 
Travis Philp
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Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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Glad you like it.

The vine did grow pretty well despite my commenting otherwise during the tour. I had forgotten that the grapes had been affected by frost because so many of the other plants still had vibrant greenery, so I made the comment about it not doing so good when I saw the leaves looking faded.

I'm going to do a pH test of that spot in the spring and see where things are at. Though the pine is well established, the soil here is on limestone bedrock and so is usually a bit on the basic side of things. I have lots of wood ash from our wood stove if need be...
 
Matt Walker
Posts: 218
Location: North Olympic Peninsula
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I love your videos Travis. I was waiting for Hershey to start eating some veggies but I guess in this episode Bowie is doing the grazing, while Hershey relaxes in the background. Good stuff man, keep it up.
 
Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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Thanks Matt. There'll be plenty more video's to come. My biggest setback is the time it takes to upload, and the many times the upload crashes before it finally works out. If not for that I'd have several other video's up already

It's funny when Bowie is around the camera. It's as if he knows about what it does because he's not usually that affectionate with me nor does he hang around as much when the camera isn't present. Hershey couldn't really care less about it, he just wants protection and reassurance.
 
Matt Walker
Posts: 218
Location: North Olympic Peninsula
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It's obvious to me that you guys all get along great. I love it. I'm not sure if you caught my garden tour vid, but it was kind of a response to your garden tour video. You inspired me, for sure. Thanks for taking the time to share what you do there.
 
Dan alan
Posts: 95
Location: Tyler Texas
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forest garden greening the desert
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I have noticed that almost always in my location pine trees have huckleberries around the drip line and grape vines growing on the center to outside edge of the huckleberries and up into the trees. Perhaps, planting the grape in the acid zone of the pine is not best?
 
Lori Crouch
Posts: 104
Location: Amarillo, TX.
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Thank you so much for this video. I am planting American Blackcurrant on the north side of our house in a section that retains water, but doesn't get full sun. So glad to see your talk on one in the shade of the pine tree. I hadn't thought about putting root crops around the fruiting trees. I am in the middle of planting some pre-frost crops and thought I would look up some tree guilds before I started planting around some more. So wonderful to happen upon this video at this very moment!
 
Jason Long
Posts: 153
Location: Davie, Fl
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.As far as all the concerns about the grapes growing in the pines, I do not believe that is an issue (Travis says its because of the frost).

When growing up I recall riding my bike throughout the town in north east Massachusetts and along the edge of the road there would be tons of grapes growing all up in the pines. Even right outside my house the grapes were growing in the pines. It may be that the grapes were in the soil underneath a different tree, but I do believe they were growing in the soil with the pines.

Jason
 
Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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Glad it was of some help Lori. I've seen red currants growing in the wild on the north end of a forest, with shade on the eastern side as well. The bushes yield heavily every year.

Jason, I've seen this too (grapes growing up pines in the wild) which is why I thought it might work here in the garden. We'll see...
 
Jason Long
Posts: 153
Location: Davie, Fl
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Hmmm, not sure why I said Tyler, I must have been thinking Tyler Luden...

Sorry about that bud!
 
mike mclellan
Posts: 93
Location: Helena, MT zone 4
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Travis, thanks for sharing what you're doing. Good idea on growing your spuds above ground to get a yield without disturbing the tree roots. Best wishes for this growing season.
 
Travis Philp
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Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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No worries Jason. It's funny, my brothers name is Tyler, so I'm used to being called that name by mistake (Usually by my parents)

You're welcome Mike. Glad you got something useful from the video. Thats why I post em. Best of luck to you too.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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Travis great video, enjoyed it. I have many of the same plants that you have, only my currants are wild black currants, that I've been taking cuttings of..however the parent plants are growing up between pine trees on the property here.

I also have grapes that came on their own growin up some pine trees in my front along the road, they are wild I think, maybe fox grapes and they produce well, but kinda skimpy clusters..wild grapes will grow up just about any tree that a bird perches on...that has eaten grapes.

It is good to see some "baby" trees in videos, as I have had to replant a lot of trees every year and am replanting some more this year, so I always have a lot of babies..but dont' really do much taking photos of the little "sticks" or baby trees, but now I'm getting some that are bearing age..from some of those sticks so maybe I'll do a walk around the garden video one of these days.

right now most of my plants are still hiding under the soil here, we have our best surge of growth in June in this area of Michigan.

interesting about the mud bath for the tree with manure..would have never thunk it.
 
Chris Kott
Posts: 796
Location: Toronto, Ontario
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Thanks for that, Travis. I don't think I'd be the only one excited to see a video update.

-CK
 
Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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I'll post an update when the trees and the groundcover plants leaf out
 
Chris Kott
Posts: 796
Location: Toronto, Ontario
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Brenda, an experiment I've been meaning to try in my area with the local wild grape is to plant hyssop, which is apparently supposed to dramatically affect production quality and quantity, if my understanding of the material is correct, although I haven't yet found a satisfactory explanation of the mechanism.

Thanks Travis, looking forward to seeing it.

-CK
 
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