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Book: earth sheltered solar greenhouse

 
Leah Sattler
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I was able to sit down and skim through the 'earth sheltered solar greenhouse' book last nite. it is excellent! I am already collecting plans and making note of materials I have to use. I think I have a perfect spot for one, although it will be awhile before I can put a shovel in the ground. that is ok though, as it will give me time to really think through it and scare up material.
 
paul wheaton
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The thing that bugs me about that book ....  it isn't a best seller. 

I think the book is excellent.  And it drives me nuts that people talking about building a greenhouse have never even heard of the book. 

And if I see one more person talk about having tomatoes in december and then build a stupid greenhouse in the winter shade, I think I'm gonna pop. 


 
Susan Monroe
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I wonder if Oehler has considered publishing it as an e-book, and selling through Amazon?  I've read that bound books are down in sales (personally, I love them!), and ebooks are up. Their prices are generally lower (about $10) and immediately available to buy and read without shipping charges.  Once you finish writing it, and convert it to .pdf format, all you do is advertise it on your website and sit back and collect the proceeds.

Well, I guess that's oversimplifying it a bit, but I'm sure it's less complicated (and less expensive) to produce than paper books.

I'm actually thinking of doing it myself.

Sue
 
Leah Sattler
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I suppose e books are going to be part of progress but I still like reading 'real books".

paul do mean to say people don't put their green houses in the sun? I have winter tomato envy. my mother grows tomatoes all year under artificial light. I want to use the sun though.

mine won't be as green or organic as the ones proposed in the book. mainly because I have my eye on some railroad ties that are piled up on the new property and some old corner posts at the old house. I will improvise as needed to utilize whatever material I have on hand. I have a steep south facing hill right off the drive that is just begging for one of these green houses.
 
paul wheaton
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Leah Sattler wrote:

paul do mean to say people don't put their green houses in the sun? I have winter tomato envy. my mother grows tomatoes all year under artificial light. I want to use the sun though.


Not only are there far too many people that are building greenhouses in 90% winter shade, but when I try to point this out before they start to build, they get all angry at me and go on and on about what an ass I am.  "Negative."  Apparently, I'm "negative."

Of course, they build the greenhouse in the warmer months and talk about all of the advantages of having a greenhouse.  At the top of the list is always tomatoes in december. 

railroad ties:  I would take them to the dump.  Or better yet, see if you can get money for them on craigslist.  They are freaky toxic. 


 
Susan Monroe
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+1 on Paul's suggestion.

Railroad ties (creosoted) are so toxic that the railroads are going to concrete ties.

They don't even have to burn to give off an incredibly strong odor, just sitting in the hot sun will do it.

Sue
 
Leah Sattler
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maybe I can trade them for something less icky. are they still using creosote? these are fairly new. I thought they stopped using that stuff. maybe I am getting it confused with the old pressure treated wood that was especially bad. 
 
paul wheaton
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I have never seen a railroad tie that didn't have toxic goo on it.

The old pressure treated stuff is toxic.  The new pressure treated stuff is just as toxic - they just use smaller amounts of stuff that is more toxic.

 
Leah Sattler
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I like to reduce my exposure to treated wood. arsenic isn't something that sounds lke a good idea to be exposed to  but copper and chromium of course it is about an unnatural amount of exposure not toxic in themselves. I think that those are the main ingredients of regular treated wood, but I seem to remember them changing the formula either to that or from that....

as for creosote, most of us are probably already exposed to some extent with cook fires and woodstoves but care to reduce exposure seems reasonable. I'm sure every burn pile I've ever had has left or gassed off a sizable amount of creosote. another point for hugelkultur!
 
Susan Monroe
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Creosote from burning wood is totally different from the creosote used to treat railroad ties and telephone poles.  This last is a product that has been distilled from coal, and is extremely toxic.

Above all, don't burn it!

Sue
 
Nicholas Covey
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I finished reading mine last night. I was way impressed at how complete it was, and what an easy read it was. I also have the "hydroponic hothouse" book that he referenced a time or two, and it took me a lot longer to read through it than to read Mike's handiwork... and Mike's is twice as long.

It's definitely worth the $ to go get it. It reads like a story more than a technical manual. I can't wait to see what he does with his next book.
 
Leah Sattler
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I am a fan of good non fiction and this one fits the bill. Its not some monotone instructional directions and figures it is very readable.
 
paul wheaton
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I think his next book is an autobiography.

I hope to go visit him when things warm up a bit.  I would very much like to take pictures of his structures. 

His videos have some pictures of this stuff. I thought it was worth $100.  Maybe once I've built a couple of these things I'll sell my copy of the videos.



 
Leah Sattler
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here is my chosen spot. its all shattered shale so I will have to find out how steep I can cut into it without risking collapse.

 
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