• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

Quickest / Easiest way to get bokashi going at home: Experiences?

 
gardener
Posts: 2732
Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
450
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi.  I'm interesting in getting wild cultures to aid in my garden,  I think I read somewhere that bokashi microbes can be caught in the wild, using rice or something.  

Does anybody have experience with easy techniques for starting bokashi?
 
pollinator
Posts: 807
175
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have always heard of bokashi as being made using grain bran, molasses, and em1. And I have made it that way, even cutting in some coffee chaffe with acceptable results.
I think that what you are describing is what is often called IMO, Indigenous Micro Organism. The technique I have heard is to cook rice thoroughly, let it cool, then place it in a sack in an open bottom wooden box tucked into the forest duff under a tree. After a couple days the rice is colonized and you can bring those soil organisms back to your garden.
I want to say that Dr. Redhawk has made some mention of the technique, and the possibility of using other grains, in one of his soil threads.
Either way, if you combine the search terms KNF (Korean natural farming) and IMO you should find more detailed protocols and suggested uses for your harvest.
 
Roberto pokachinni
gardener
Posts: 2732
Location: Fraser River Headwaters, Zone3, Lat: 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
450
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike solar woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok, thanks S.  will check that out.
 
I suggest huckleberry pie. But the only thing on the gluten free menu is this tiny ad:
Native Bee Guide - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/wiki/140436/Native-Bee-Guide-FREE
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic