Win a copy of Building Community this week in the City Repair forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • James Freyr
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Carla Burke

chop and drop regrets

 
pollinator
Posts: 463
Location: N. California
145
hugelkultur kids cat dog fungi trees books chicken cooking ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was asking the good and wise people of permise  what mulch they prefer for the veggie garden, (Which mulch should be used in the veggie garden?) and Ann Miller suggested living mulch, and I thought that was a super idea.  I have been trying to decide what to plant.  I thought it would be a win win if I could chop and drop it as well.  It got me thinking, and I wanted to ask if any of you planted something for a mulch, or for chop and drop purposes, and had regrets, and why.  Example I planted borage.  I don't really regret it, but when I talk to people about it I make sure to tell them it will reseed itself all over.  Unless you are very careful, at least where I live once you plant it you have it for life.  I thought it would be useful to know what I should avoid, or at least take extra care with when planting.  Thanks
 
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good question. I'm personally very tolerant of wayward living mulches, but I did find others in my communal permaculture garden were a bit more bothered by plants going out of the bounds we planned for them. Borage was one for the same reason you described. Strawberries were another. I guess the important thing is to know before you start what you and other stakeholders are comfortable with in terms of plants that seed or spread freely.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2662
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
318
books composting toilet bee rocket stoves wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Comfrey. Not a regret as such, but one you plant it in a spot it is there for ever. Mine produce great quantities of material with minimal effort - literally slash it back two or three times per year.  But keep it away from any area you might want to cultivate.
 
pollinator
Posts: 261
Location: istanbul - turkey
85
hugelkultur dog books urban greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Swiss chard. It grows like weeds. Not the worst problem ever, but if we have another meal from it I might puke. I am not going to let it self seed ever.
Mint is another one.
Bermuda grass (dont judge me please, it was my first year into permaculture)
 
master steward
Posts: 3601
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1018
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't have any chop and drop regrets.

I just wanted to mention that clovers are the best living mulches reason being that they protect the soil from wind and erosion. The clovers will work hard to improve soil health. Besides being a great living mulch the clovers will attract pollinators and beneficial insects.

I only have experience using winter rye on our lawn where we used to live.
 
gardener
Posts: 1495
Location: South of Capricorn
529
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a huge population of snails and slugs, and chop and drop just encourages them. It took me a long time to figure this out. (I did discover that drier mulches are not as hospitable for the snails and slugs, but are great habitat for the spotted beetles that destroy my beans. Sigh).
 
This is my favorite tiny ad:
2020 BB20 Skill Building Event
https://permies.com/wiki/144815/BB-Skill-Building-Event
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic