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Stubborn Kunekune

 
master gardener
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Location: southern Illinois, USA
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I have a gilt who has found her way into the goat pen and refuses to leave.  The goats are not happy and keep telling her she is baaad.  It has had no effect. My usual bribe of apples is ignored. Any ideas?
 
gardener
Posts: 499
Location: Nara, Japan. Zone 8-ish
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I've had success with corn cobs or fish as bait to get a pig to move.

But if she found herself in the goat pen by accident and doesn't know about gates/doors, she may not leave because she thinks she is stuck. I had a pig I was sitting for escape by accident; I think he got shocked and ran under, instead of back into his pen. The pig pen was electrified, and they hadn't been moved since brought to that farm, so the pig thought it would be shocked if it tried to cross the threshold, even to get back in. I lured with corn cobs, but at the threshold of his pen he would freak out and turn around.

Eventually we made a kind of chute, lured him in with corn cobs, followed from behind with improvised pig boards so he could only go forward and forced him across the threshold back into his pen...

If she won't follow you, you could try some kind of chute that leads back to her pen. If she is still small, maybe trap her in a dog crate and carry her back.

I'm curious to know how you get her back to her pen. Or if she assimilates with your goats...

 
rocket scientist
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A five gallon bucket held over their head will have them backing up quickly.
 
pollinator
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Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Nothing gets my pigs moving faster than a slap in the ass. Mine are all bucket trained though. They see the bucket and they run as fast as their tiny legs can carry them.
 
John F Dean
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I will try the bucket approach to try to get her into a crate.  She is getting along well with the goats.
 
John F Dean
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We have had pretty steady rain around here, so I didn't feel like wrestling the Kune in the mud. This morn the sun was out, so I figured today was the day. I gathered up the bucket, crate, and wagon.    I opened the gate to the goats. The Kune trotted out and walked right back to her pen.

Now to be clear, while she  has had access to plenty of fresh water, her food rations had been significantly reduced.  
 
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