gift
Clean With Cleaners You Can Eat by Raven Ranson
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Burra Maluca
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Carla Burke
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • Steve Thorn

Plant wishlist

 
Posts: 41
4
forest garden foraging hunting
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey everyone I'm new here. I've got a ton of perennials in ground and I'm planning out next year's grow list. Does anyone know a seed/seedling source for the following:

Reichardia picroides (French Scorzonera is one of the common names, but they are not related)

Clinopodium glabellum (Glade Savory)

Blephilia subnuda (Cumberland Pagoda Plant)

Apios priceana (Price's Potatobean)

Lilium grayi (Gray's Lily)

Silene ovata (Blue Ridge Catchfly)

Torreya taxifolia (Florida Nutmeg aka Stinking Yew)

Rhexia parviflora (White Meadowbeauty)

Crataegus harbisonii (Nashville Hawthorn)

Campanula versicolor (Various-colored Bellflower)

So far I have the following growing:
Tree collards, Appalachian bee balm, Sea orache, Musk mallow, Pondberry (southern spicebush), Clementines, Persimmons (Saijo, Hachiya, Prok), Blue Giant Hyssop, Pitcher Sage (remains to be seen about edibility), Schisandra, Muscadine, Black raspberry, Red Raspberry, Black Currant, Chicory, Asparagus, Walking onion, Rose of Sharon, and Yarrow.

I might have Scootberry, Stingless nettle, and Udo if I'm lucky.

Other plants on my "to grow" list I HAVE sources for: Yampah, Banana Yucca, Chilean Guava, Good-King-Henry, Japanese Honewort, King's Spear, Turkish Rocket, Sea Kale, French Scorzonera, Winter Savory, Black Salsify, Shiso, Hercules' Club, Shepherd's Purse, Daylily, and Camas.

I only have 1/3 an acre. Would you guys recommend crossing any of the listed items off my list as unpalatable? Are there some on my "to grow" list you would put as "preferred?"

Thanks!

 
gardener
Posts: 874
Location: Piedmont 7a
308
2
hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome aboard, Adam, great to have you here!

I am not familiar with the plants you mention, but you have certainly given me some great ideas of plants to consider!  I have been meaning to get serious about perennials. Really looking forward to hearing about your experiences with these and your impressions.

Of the perennials you already have, any clear favorites?
 
Adam LeCroy
Posts: 41
4
forest garden foraging hunting
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm in my first growing season, so it remains to be seen about the perennialness of the plants.

Best:
Chicory. I broadcast seeded a mulched area in winter (did nothing else) and I have about 5,000 12 inch long 4 inch wide leaves. I'll probably have to thin it.
Rose of Sharon. Was pre established, but my kids love eating the leaves and buds off the salad tree.
Black currant (Consort from Burpee). Has about 100 berries per plant.
Pondberry. I'm surprised how well this plant is doing based on the flooding we got this winter and where it's planted. Leaves like sassafras (no flowers or berries yet).

Good:
Musk mallow. Growing very well, not taste testing until next year.
Blue giant hyssop. Pretty sure it's growing well, could also be volunteers of perilla. Leaf shape very similar.
Appalachian bee balm. Kind of fragile and I sampled early to see how it smelled. It's basically a flowering large leaved oregano.
Muscadine. A volunteer from one part of my yard transplanted to another. Growing well.
Asparagus. About a 50% growth rate from the huge box of crowns I got from Burpee planted in subpar soil.
Yarrow. Pre established. Doing fine.

Bad:
Sea orache. Planted lots of seeds in different growing conditions (potting soil mix next to Musk mallows, a wetter area with partial sun on clay, sandy area in shade) only 1 verified plant so far out of hundreds of seeds.
Schisandra. (Eastern Prince from Burpee). Very slow growth from a potted plant, hopefully that means it's putting down good roots, but I'm not hopeful.
Udo. Attempted from seed, and a seedling. Both seem to have failed.
Black raspberry. This was transplanted from the wild. It put out berries and new growth then yellowed and died. We'll see if it comes back next year.
Walking onion. Planted several bulbs in an area, only two have survived and only one is looking like it may survive to year two.
Scootberry. First planting failed, attempting again.
Chilean guava. First planting failed, attempting again.
Yampah. First planting failed, hopefully will attempt again.


TBD:
Persimmons. The Hachiya was from Home Depot and needs some training away from its significant lean. The Prok is doing the best. The Saijo's leaves are looking awfully wilty on day three of the transplant.
Red raspberry. Biennial growth pattern, primocanes this year are doing fine, very bushy.
Clementines. These went in the ground last winter, we'll see if they survive this winter (Alabama).
Stingless nettle. Looks to have failed, but too early to decide.

Highest priority items I don't have: Various-colored Bellflower, Banana yucca, Yampah, Price's potatobean, French scorzonera.


 
pollinator
Posts: 280
Location: WV
56
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I may have missed it, but didn't see elderberry on your list. Also I know there are a few here who grow apios Americana and might be familiar with or direct you to a source of apios priceana
 
Adam LeCroy
Posts: 41
4
forest garden foraging hunting
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Michelle Heath wrote:I may have missed it, but didn't see elderberry on your list. Also I know there are a few here who grow apios Americana and might be familiar with or direct you to a source of apios priceana



I'm also an active forager. If I had the inclination, 50 lbs of elderberry would not be out of the question. I still have a quart of tincture and 2 quarts of elderberry syrup from last year. I also have ready access to Beautyberry, Oregon grape, Sumac, Mayapple, Maypop, and Woodsorrel. Thanks for the tip on Apios. I know B&T World Seeds sometimes gets it, hopefully one of the americana growers will see this post.
 
Artie Scott
gardener
Posts: 874
Location: Piedmont 7a
308
2
hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Adam, I meant to ask - what zone are you?
 
Adam LeCroy
Posts: 41
4
forest garden foraging hunting
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Artie Scott wrote:Adam, I meant to ask - what zone are you?



7a
gift
 
Clean With Cleaners You Can Eat by Raven Ranson
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic