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where are you buying your Sea-90?

 
Posts: 143
Location: Southern New Hampshire (Zone 5)
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I'm interested in trying some Sea-90 minerals in my garden and to feed to my chickens, but the online stores are charging too much for shipping.  Like, shipping costs more than the product.

There are no local distributors within 100 miles of me.  

Are there alternative mineral products that may be equally effective?

I have a 3,000 square foot annual vegetable garden, plus a small amount of fruit and berry perennials.  I'm also interested in offering mineralized water to my flock of 8 laying hens.

How much Sea-90 would I use in a year?  
 
steward
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I buy my Sea-90 from 7 Springs Farm Supply. https://www.7springsfarm.com

I agree with you about the difficulty to find it locally so I can just go buy some and not pay shipping. To bring shipping costs down, I'll get several 50lb bags, some bags of kelp, and maybe some other things as well so the pallet freight charge gets down to under $20 per item. It may be a lot of money up front, but it'll last me a year or a little more. There is a distributor 2 hours away from me so I can save on shipping and go get it, but I have to buy 2000lbs at a time. I'm not opposed to that as I would need almost that much to apply to my small farm pastures, but, my wife and I are being careful budgeting and prioritizing our funds so that kind of thing goes to the bottom of the list right now.

I have a 3,000 square foot annual vegetable garden, plus a small amount of fruit and berry perennials.  I'm also interested in offering mineralized water to my flock of 8 laying hens.

How much Sea-90 would I use in a year?  



The application rate for soil use according to the manufacturers website is 50lbs to an acre. At 43,560 square feet in an acre, I'd imagine one 50lb sack would get you through several years, and provide delicious salt for cooking. I've been using sea-90 for years as my go-to salt for foods and love it. If 50lbs is too much for your needs, the maker has a 10lb bag plus a 1lb bag for cooking for under $30. I don't know what shipping would be as it varies on location, but this may be a more economical way to get trace minerals into your annual vegetable garden.

https://seaagri.com/product/combo-sea-salt-table/?v=400b9db48e62

Hope this helps!

 
Davis Tyler
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thanks, that was helpful

maybe I'll just start with 10 lbs since a little goes a long way

what's the difference with the Baja Gold product for cooking?  Isn't the regular Sea-90 product fit for human consumption?
 
pollinator
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I got mine online from New Country Organics, but I got a dealer 1 hrs drive away so I am getting sea salt locally next time.

NCO website got a store locator, I saw your are in new Hampshire, right? They have one listed so maybe you can check it out.
But the address seems to be incomplete.

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Davis Tyler
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that's interesting the NCO site lists Sea-90 as "sold out" online

They do list several local-ish stores near me, but the Sea-Agri dealer locator doesn't show them as dealers?
 
James Freyr
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Davis Tyler wrote:

what's the difference with the Baja Gold product for cooking?  Isn't the regular Sea-90 product fit for human consumption?



So it's all the same salt, and the only difference I've noticed is particle size, with the Sea-90 being very coarse granules and the Baja Gold being smaller particles. Years ago I called the company and asked if there was any difference and he said all the different labels were for regulatory reasons and what's inside is all the same salt.
 
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I'm a big fan of sea-crop, and shipping is free on single gallons direct from the manufacturer, sea-crop.com.

Its not as convenient as dry salt but its incredibly effective in my experience. I use it at 2-2.5 ml per gallon and usually spread it around the garden a couple times a year. Usually I just add it with compost tea so I don't add another time that I'm feeding liquid stuff
 
Davis Tyler
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s. lowe wrote:I'm a big fan of sea-crop, and shipping is free on single gallons direct from the manufacturer, sea-crop.com.

Its not as convenient as dry salt but its incredibly effective in my experience. I use it at 2-2.5 ml per gallon and usually spread it around the garden a couple times a year. Usually I just add it with compost tea so I don't add another time that I'm feeding liquid stuff



ah, I remember hearing about SeaCrop before.  I'm surprised that it would be cheaper than shipping solids only - water weight is expensive to truck long distances.  The label says it's 20% solids by volume, so 80% water.  So a $59 gallon bottle gets you ~2lbs of minerals?

"SEA-CROP® is a concentrate that contains all of the wonderful goodness of seawater in concentrated form but with the sodium chloride 95% reduced."

Is this an advantage over Sea-90, which does NOT have reduced sodium?
 
s. lowe
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Davis Tyler wrote:

s. lowe wrote:I'm a big fan of sea-crop, and shipping is free on single gallons direct from the manufacturer, sea-crop.com.

Its not as convenient as dry salt but its incredibly effective in my experience. I use it at 2-2.5 ml per gallon and usually spread it around the garden a couple times a year. Usually I just add it with compost tea so I don't add another time that I'm feeding liquid stuff



ah, I remember hearing about SeaCrop before.  I'm surprised that it would be cheaper than shipping solids only - water weight is expensive to truck long distances.  The label says it's 20% solids by volume, so 80% water.  So a $59 gallon bottle gets you ~2lbs of minerals?

"SEA-CROP® is a concentrate that contains all of the wonderful goodness of seawater in concentrated form but with the sodium chloride 95% reduced."

Is this an advantage over Sea-90, which does NOT have reduced sodium?


My opinion is that  sea crop is a superior product , both because the reduced sodium-chloride means you can apply more trace minerals without worrying about "salt" build up and because by not fully dehydrating there is anaerobic ocean biology that is maintained.

Sea-90 and similar products make sense for large acreage that isn't irrigated but for garden  settings I think sea crop is worth the extra cost. I've noticed super positive plant responses, primarily in disease and peat resistance. And in my professional career I've seen a marked increase in aromatics from adding sea crop to the rotation
 
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