• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
  • jordan barton
stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Liv Smith
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Nancy Reading
  • Beau Davidson
  • Heather Sharpe

Legume plants

 
Posts: 241
Location: 9A Marion County Fl
17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I had asked this once before and I don't remember ever seeing a response

I'm wondering if there's a list of Legume plants that are available to be grown in my area which is 9 a central North Florida I'd like to plant only native plants as much as possible.

I'd like to also plant something that is going to benefit the soil if I'm going to plant anything at all.

Id also like to know if all these plants are equal in what they can potentially give back to the earth.

I know very little about plants and any links that explain the benefits of legume and how/ why it benefits soil that explain the details in a simple manner would be appreciated. Thanks
 
master steward
Posts: 8561
Location: USDA Zone 8a
2574
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't know what Le Jeune plants are.

I have some experience growing plants in Florida so these might help:

Mimosa tree, redbud tree, and white clover.  Look at your native wildflower for some legumes also.

This link will give you a list:

https://www.nsis.org/garden/family/legume.html
 
pollinator
Posts: 458
Location: Central Texas zone 8a, 800 chill hours 28 blessed inches of rain
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jason Walter wrote:
I know very little about plants and any links that explain the benefits of legume and how/ why it benefits soil that explain the details in a simple manner would be appreciated. Thanks



legume plants have evolved to have a partnership with a bacteria that it hosts on its roots.  The bacteria gathers nitrogen from the air and stores it on root nodules to help feed the plant.  When the plant dies, these root nodules release any stored nitrogen into the soil for the next plant.  

That is all one really needs to know about the process.  The bacteria is sometimes in the soil already or one can buy inoculant to add to seeds or existing roots.  As far as a list of legumes for FL, I am sure there are many that would grow in your climate.  Here is a list of Legumes.

About half way down the page:  Legumes  
 
Jason Walter
Posts: 241
Location: 9A Marion County Fl
17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:I don't know what Le Jeune plants are.

I have some experience growing plants in Florida so these might help:

Mimosa tree, redbud tree, and white clover.  Look at your native wildflower for some legumes also.

This link will give you a list:

https://www.nsis.org/garden/family/legume.html



I mispelled the word Legume. I have tried to correct the mispelling, evidently staff has to approve the correction.Thanks for the link
 
Posts: 100
Location: Chipley, FL
23
trees chicken homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jason Walter wrote:
I'm wondering if there's a list of Le Jeune plants that are available to be grown in my area which is 9 a central North Florida I'd like to plant only native plants as much as possible.



Never heard the term "Le Jeune plants." Is that some sort of spell check swap for "legume?"

Legumes (pea family) typically are nitrogen fixers and often do well in poor soils as a result.  I'm up in 8b north and west of you and am looking for appropriate legumes also.  So far I'm working with black and honey locusts (not sure either is native this far south, but my black locusts are doing quite well so far) and pink-eyed purple hulls mostly.  There are a wide variety of cowpea family crops that should do well at least part of the year.  The cowpea family (crowder, iron & clay, black-eyed, etc.) are more heat-tolerant than most of the other bean/pea crops so can do well in Southern summers.)

Mimosa is non-native but pretty much naturalized.  Same family, also fixes nitrogen.  There are a lot of other non-native members of the family should work in your zone.  Check out GreenDreams youtube channel.  Believe they are right there in zone 9 and are expert on this topic.

Another useful family member would be pigeon pea, which is sort of marginal for me.  I got some seeds for a variety that is supposed to be cold-tolerant here, but haven't yet tried them.  I'll plant some in the spring and see if they survive the following winter, otherwise may just use them as an annual.  It's not native, however. It does produce useful pods (basis of hummus) and grows into a large shrub or small tree, so persists better than standard legume annuals like pink-eyed purple hulls which die back after fruiting.

Any crop in the bean/pea family that you can grow in your zone will improve the soil.  That includes English peas, snow peas, green beans, pole beans, etc.  If you look at heirlooms you can find some that would be close to what was native in pre-columbian times, but mostly they are all bred/hybridized these days.
 
Jason Walter
Posts: 241
Location: 9A Marion County Fl
17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
 
pollinator
Posts: 3423
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7 AHS:4 GDD:3000 Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
438
2
forest garden solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Perennial Peanut For ground cover
Pigeon Pea for edible shrub, it also unlocks phosphorus, in addition to fixing nitrogen and an edible bean
 
I'm doing laundry! Look how clean this tiny ad is:
Free, earth friendly heat - Kickstarter going on now!
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/free-heat
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic