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Growing organic heritage wheat and rye the old way with nitrogen fixers

 
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Location: Michigan
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Hi!

I wanted to add this because I really believe in what this little farm is doing in rural OH. I met them with a chance stay at their air bnb and now I travel there to help on weekends. Their vision is to have an educational facility where people go to live off grid and enjoy farm life while learning about farming the right way and proper maintenance of a forest and native plants. They have many varieties of plants but the ones they are looking to commercialise (and I hope they get it right) are Banatka wheat (as a person with Celiac this is the one I am most interested in) Rye and Elderberries.

A couple weeks ago we disked the land - went over it about 5 times before planting this last weekend. In future they want to do no till but need equipment for that. So we disked and this weekend we planted Rye and Wheat. With the Rye we planted Vetch and red and white clover and with the wheat red and white clover. They started with a handful of seeds and over the past three years have built it to where we plated 5 acres! I am so excited to see the journey of growth and love learning about no fertilizer, no pesticide ancient heritage grains that I am so hopeful I can actually eat (and drink beer and pizza and coissents - trust me its rough being celiac.
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Location: Denver, 6a / BSk, rental house dweller, going back to Wheaton Labs soon
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Cool! Planting the grains intermixed with the nigtrogen fixers seems effective, and sounds similar to what Gabe Brown talks about in his video:


Also, do you know what kind the Rye is?  I'm wondering if it's similar to the famed Sepp Holzer grain? https://permies.com/t/1316/Sepp-Holzer-perennial-grain
 
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Location: Saratoga Springs NY
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I have grown wheat in my gardens for a few years. Banatka is a heritage wheat, but it is modern wheat and would not be good for people with celiac disease. The ancient wheat Einkorn is the one that has different proteins from modern wheat and may not cause problems for people with celiac disease.

I grow Alice white clover as a companion crop with my wheat. Hairy vetch does not do good things for small grains. It tends to vine up onto the straw and pull the wheat down. Also, once it goes to seed it is VERY hard to get rid of. Vetch has "hard" seed, which means some of it doesn't germinate until year 2 and some not until year 3. To get rid of it you have to rogue out the vetch completely for at least three years. Ouch.
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