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Wattle and daub/electricity

 
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Good Morning/Day/Afternoon/evening All,

In the process of buying a bungalow, ceiling height is 2.4meter. Interior walls are made of plasterboard on timber frame. All needs to be ripped out, want to change layout, house was unoccupied at least for 7-8 years. No mould or any visible water in any of the walls (good sign ). We want to create a new layout with interior walls made by our own hands. Wattle and daub is our choice on 2-3 courses of concrete block and DPC membrane to avoid water in walls. Would like to make 100mm thick walls (non load bearings) How would we go about our electrical wiring? I was thinking of some kind of underground conduit built in the wall as we make them...not sure about the socket boxes themselves....anyone has any recommendations?

Thanks.
 
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Running conduit in the new walls sounds like the right choice; I think PVC would be best to avoid ever having corrosion issues. Obviously the less conduit you have to deal with, the better, so a good efficient layout before you start building will be important. What are exterior walls, and how is electricity running in them now (if any)? Where is the main electrical panel?

You mention using concrete block for the lower courses of the new walls... while a good plan for exterior walls, I would question the need for it on interior walls. If you need such serious moisture protection, I would be concerned for your furniture and rugs. What is the existing floor made of? The new walls will be going on what is now the middle of rooms in some cases. I presume the floor is on grade without a basement or crawl space. If you want a moisture barrier, I would think a layer of it on the floor before you start building the walls would suffice. How will the vertical poles for the wattle and daub be secured at the base? A base plate?
 
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You may find some interior walls hold the roof up.
Are there any redeeming features of the house?
Your plans just seem radical.

What foundations does the place have and where are they located?
Sometimes when a wall is removed, a hole on the floor is exposed.
 
Sean Smith
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Glenn Herbert wrote:Running conduit in the new walls sounds like the right choice; I think PVC would be best to avoid ever having corrosion issues. Obviously the less conduit you have to deal with, the better, so a good efficient layout before you start building will be important. What are exterior walls, and how is electricity running in them now (if any)? Where is the main electrical panel?

You mention using concrete block for the lower courses of the new walls... while a good plan for exterior walls, I would question the need for it on interior walls. If you need such serious moisture protection, I would be concerned for your furniture and rugs. What is the existing floor made of? The new walls will be going on what is now the middle of rooms in some cases. I presume the floor is on grade without a basement or crawl space. If you want a moisture barrier, I would think a layer of it on the floor before you start building the walls would suffice. How will the vertical poles for the wattle and daub be secured at the base? A base plate?

Hi, thanks for your answer. I do not know how they fixed the electricity in exterior walls...the house is a concrete built bungalow. All interior walls are made of a really lightweight timber frame..I am working in a timber framing company... Interior walls are lower than roof joists so they do not hold any load. Floor is poured concrete. There is no sign of moisture in any walls. Walls will be fixed to a soleplate. Usually we fix a treated soleplate 400cc with 115mm screws drilled into the concrete. This is sufficient for interior walls. Probably would not bother with concrete blocks then..just put a layer of DPC then soleplate then DPC then the walls themselves. Plan is to make wall panels consisting vertical poles then fix those to soleplates.
 
Sean Smith
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John C Daley wrote:You may find some interior walls hold the roof up.
Are there any redeeming features of the house?
Your plans just seem radical.

What foundations does the place have and where are they located?
Sometimes when a wall is removed, a hole on the floor is exposed.

Hi John, interior walls are lower than the attic joists. They are non load bearing walls. Timber frame interior walls are sheeted with plasterboard. There is poured concrete foundation under exterior concrete walls and poured concrete floor. We want to change interior layout hence ripping out existing walls came up as an idea...
 
Sean Smith
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Redeeming features: 0.8 acre site on a low slope hillside, excellent views, quiet place, neighbours are a few hundred meters away. A well built garage, close to my workplace, in a rural area. All windows recently changed. Affordable selling price.
 
John C Daley
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Your original plan sounded crazy, but the explanation has cleared that away.
It sounds like a great place.
Maybe send us some photos of the house and the view?
Have fun with it anyway.
 
Glenn Herbert
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So if there is electricity in exterior walls, it would be in conduit... Does any wiring go from exterior walls through interior walls? Would any of it be disturbed by tearing out the walls? Rerouting would probably be a pain or unsightly or both...

Concrete floor slab sounds easy enough to relocate walls on, maybe just patch a few screw holes and refinish. You say "timber frame"; we would call what you have a stud wall rather than a timber frame. Timber implies larger pieces of wood.
 
Sean Smith
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Glenn Herbert wrote:So if there is electricity in exterior walls, it would be in conduit... Does any wiring go from exterior walls through interior walls? Would any of it be disturbed by tearing out the walls? Rerouting would probably be a pain or unsightly or both...

Concrete floor slab sounds easy enough to relocate walls on, maybe just patch a few screw holes and refinish. You say "timber frame"; we would call what you have a stud wall rather than a timber frame. Timber implies larger pieces of wood.

Yes, it is stud wall, we call the vertical pieces studs...😀 Do not know about electricity going from exterior to interior...but we want to rewire the whole entirely...will have to talk to an electrician...hence my questions about running conduits in wattle and daub walls....it is not common around here to have cob or adobe or wattle daub buildings. Originally they built everything from stone. Then switched to concrete blocks and "timber frame"=stud walls (I think in some places they are called stick wall as well).
 
Sean Smith
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John C Daley wrote:Your original plan sounded crazy, but the explanation has cleared that away.
It sounds like a great place.
Maybe send us some photos of the house and the view?
Have fun with it anyway.

Yes I know it sounds crazy, but you have to do what you have to do...😀 I'll post pictures once we'll get the keys. Solicitors are not racehorses around here....1 month gone from talking to solicitor...could be another 2 months by the time we get the keys. Of course we are short of money, so we'll have to do as much as we can ourselves. We got an oven, a Stanley range, a bathtub, a dining table with chairs and kitchen cupboard doors for free...hunting for free stuff all the time...want to move in by next October....will be a crazy busy period. Want to start an orchard and veg garden plus a greenhouse glasshouse over next 2 years. Want to have apples pears plums pears damsons all kinds of berries. Chickens. Will buy a scythe, used to cut alfalfa on a hectare by scythe with my father and brother...so I am pretty confident with it...peening and sharpening is not a problem....😀 We want to keep our spot as much organic as we can. Will use washing nuts, want to use as much rainwater as we can, plenty of it in Ireland....😀 Will post pics asap once having the keys. Sorry for bragging...😀
 
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This is one of my compulsions and may not be useful to you. Whenever I lay new concrete, stucco walls, etc that could cause problems in the future if I need more wiring, plumbing, etc. I run an empty conduit, pipe etc for future use. For example, putting an unused 4 inch pipe under my driveway 15 years ago saved me a great deal of pain  when I needed to run a new water pipe under it a couple of years ago.

To be clear, I ran a 3/4 inch pipe through the existing 4 inch pipe.
 
Sean Smith
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John F Dean wrote:This is one of my compulsions and may not be useful to you. Whenever I lay new concrete, stucco walls, etc that could cause problems in the future if I need more wiring, plumbing, etc. I run an empty conduit, pipe etc for future use. For example, putting an unused 4 inch pipe under my driveway 15 years ago saved me a great deal of pain  when I needed to run a new water pipe under it a couple of years ago.

To be clear, I ran a 3/4 inch pipe through the existing 4 inch pipe.

Thank you for the suggestion, Will keep in mind!!! Really really helpful...so simple most of us wouldn't think about it...😀 Much easier to have an extra pipe under the concrete in the wall than cutting ripping chiselling later....
 
pollinator
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yeah thats the way most people do it. they put a PVC or other wide pipe through the wall, or conveniently located depending on the design...like along the bottom of the wall or top, etc
.... all electrical wires and cords would go through that pipe.
 
leila hamaya
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and totally a good call for under driveways too...if you ever need to get a hose across the driveway ... thats the only time i have done that...to get the hose under the driveway so people werent driving over it every day...
 
Sean Smith
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leila hamaya wrote:and totally a good call for under driveways too...if you ever need to get a hose across the driveway ... thats the only time i have done that...to get the hose under the driveway so people werent driving over it every day...



I'll keep that in my mind, hopefully we can start our renovation process soon. Will put up photos as we go along.
 
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