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How Resistant to Chestnut Blight is the Allegheny Chinquapin (Dwarf Chestnut)?

 
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Thank you to anyone taking the time to read and respond to my question. I am curious about Castanea Pumila (Dwarf Chestnut or Allegheny Chinquapin) and its response to Chestnut Blight.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castanea_pumila

I have attempted to research this on my own and have found various references ranging between people saying it's fully resistant to people saying it's fully susceptible, and many in between. None seem to have any real sources and none go into detail on what they mean by 'partial resistance'. I was hoping this forum could clear things up.

1. So in specific, my questions are:

How does Castanea Pumila react to Chestnut Blight? Is it fully susceptible, fully resistant, or somewhere in the middle? If it's in the middle, how does this manifest itself? Is it only a superficial wounding? Is it cankered but not killed? Does it reduce their lifespan or cause them to be less healthy? Does it stop producing nuts or produce less and generally become less vigorous? Does it die back but only after reaching reproductive age for some time? Does it have no effect on some individual trees and devastating effects on others? Etc etc.

2. My second question is if anyone has knowledge or experience with Castanea x neglecta? If anyone’s unfamiliar, this is a named cross between Castanea Dentata (American Chestnut) and Castanea Pumila. I also can't seem to find any information about this online. If anyone has any knowledge on this I would be very curious to hear it, and I would have the same questions as above, with additional ones about what advantages this cross has over regular Castanea Pumila alone and in what ways.

Here is the wikipedia page if anyone would like to take a look.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castanea_%C3%97_neglecta

Thanks to anyone again for taking the time to help me with these issues. It is certainly appreciated, and I look forward to reading the responses.
 
pollinator
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Here is a quote from a 1993 report linked in the "further reading" section of the chinquapin wiki page;

"Chinkapins are susceptible to Phytophthora cinnamomi root rot (Crandall et al. 1945). The Allegheny chinkapin is reported to be rather resistant to the chestnut blight fungus caused by Cryphonectria (Endothia) parasitica (Murr.) Barr (Chandler 1957); however, diseased and heavily cankered trees have been found in Georgia and Louisiana (Wallace and Peacher 1970). Chinkapins blight to some degree, but they continue to sucker and send up shoots from the root collar and, despite cankering, produce fruit. Castanea pumila has been widely used in the breeding programs for blight resistance (Graves 1950; Jaynes 1975). 'Alamoore', a C. crenata x C. pumila, was introduced in 1952 by the Alabama Agr. Expt. Sta. because it was blight resistant, prolific, and early bearing (Brooks and Olmo 1972). According to a blight researcher (S. Anagnostakis pers. commun.) the chinkapin hybrids are as susceptible to chestnut blight as American chestnuts, C. dentata (Marsh.) Borkh., based on inoculation tests with two strains of Cryphonectria parasitica. "

Here's the link; https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1993/V2-500.html

Seems like it has potential. I personally like Mark Sheppards suggestion to find and breed resistance by planting millions of seedlings and largely neglecting them, except to identify individuals that appear to show increased resistance from.which to harvest.the next.generation.  this dwarf species is interesting as well and may offer a lot of advantages. Let us know if you try any experiments with these
 
Isaiah Bohin
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Thanks for the great response. I read through a few studies but none were as informative as that one.

I plan for this to be a major starch producer in a future food forest, along with the resistant American chestnut if that ever gets distributed. Hopefully it will produce well for me.
 
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