• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Anyone growing Chinquapin?

 
                                
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm in zone 6.  I've been trying to do an edible hedge type gardening system using some permaculture principles.  I'd like to try my hand at Allegheny chinquapin ( Castanea pumila) , but information on backyard culture is scarce. 

The main question I have is are they worth growing?  I've read accounts of people getting bountiful heaps of sweet-tasting, easily shelled nuts from them, and others saying they don't produce well at all. 

Anyone have these in a suburban setting? 
 
Delilah Gill
Posts: 35
Location: Southern Georgia
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Old post but here goes. I grow them, got 2 trees. One produces lots of nuts, other one is younger. I highly recommend them, even better, grow butternuts. Butternuts taste wonderful, but beware them thorns.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Pie
Posts: 8978
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
132
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm thinking of giving them a try at some point. Here's some references I found on various chinquapins:

http://www.acf.org/Tree_ID/ckapin.php

http://www.wegrowit.com/adams_images/chinquapin.html

http://www.ozarkchinquapin.com/
 
                                  
Posts: 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
From talking to various people and direct observation, the blight kills them to the ground before they can produce and other diseases, including insects, take their toll on them. 

You might try over on http://www.chestnutsonline.com/forum/

They aren't hard to find in the ozarks, they are distinct once you know what they look like.

In Stamet's book Mycelium Running, there is an interesting account of the Chaga fungus being used to innoculate the American Chestnut against the blight.  If you search inside the book on google books this can be read.  If you read this and have more questions, post them here and PM me.  I've been reading a bit about this lately and have gathered some seed that are not resistant.  I can also point you to where to find wild, unresistant germplasm.  All in all, its a good idea to get some seeds from the foundation mentioned above.  Its worth noting they are the size of acorns and are a smaller tree so they will have a slightly different niche compared to a larger chestnut imo.
 
Chris Holcombe
Posts: 97
Location: Zone 8b Portland
food preservation forest garden fungi
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have them going in little pots in my basement. I can second what those links said about keeping the soil somewhat on the dry side. I had a pot that held water and the chinquapin's hated it. I purchased my seeds from empire chestnut. They were about $15. You'll need to wait until the fall to get more. When I received mine they were already sprouting. Kind of interesting that they don't wait until spring to get going. I've been wondering when I should start moving them outside.
 
Hey cool! They got a blimp! But I have a tiny ad:
Got Permaculture games? Yes! 66 cards, infinite possibilities::
www.FoodForestCardGame
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic