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Chicken composting is best composting!

 
gardener
Posts: 3301
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
399
forest garden trees urban
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Ok, I'm being the drama here,  but I do love my little partners.
They always put in the work,  you know what I mean?
Take at look :
IMG_20201210_151827.jpg
 I dumped this pile of old bedding into their composting yard at at 3:18
I dumped this pile of old bedding into their composting yard at at 3:18
IMG_20201210_152418.jpg
3:24, pile is gone, replaced with slight depression...
3:24, pile is gone, replaced with slight depression...
IMG_20201210_152001.jpg
 Their new bedding includes 5 gallons of bio char
Their new bedding includes 5 gallons of bio char
 
pollinator
Posts: 212
Location: Northwest Missouri
83
forest garden fungi gear trees plumbing chicken cooking ungarbage
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I've never been a fan of deep litter style chicken runs... but I do dump their coop bedding into the run just to keep the soil covered (since naturally they consume every living thing down to bare earth!) I'm coming around though. There's a few placed they scratched down to the dirt lately and it's beautiful black earth under there now!
It may be time for me to stop being so controlling with my yard and other waste and just leave it for the birds to sort out. The work of moving it to them and collecting it is likely less work than trying to mix compost and turn it myself.
So what do you think? Could I toss in a few piles of leaves and grass clippings and just give them a year or so to break it down for me?
 
William Bronson
gardener
Posts: 3301
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
399
forest garden trees urban
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A few loads will probably not last very long, but absolutely, give those girls some yard "waste", they will love it!
When there isn't any bulk carbon in the run,  I will turn the soil with a fork.
They come running, picking through the chunks,  scratching, digging,  eating things too small for me to see.

I even give them woody branch prunings that have green leaves.
The eat what they want and leave the rest.
I leave it  until I'm ready to turn the soil,  then I rake them into a pile for bio char making.
 
pollinator
Posts: 349
Location: Virginia
128
books chicken cooking
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We used to have a compost pile, but we quit it since the yard waste portion that went to the bird yard always turned out better looking. They are happy and it's one less thing for us to do.

Like William, my husband turns over chunks of dirt for the flock and they come running to him when they see him with a shovel or fork! Fun to watch😀

We have also put some bigger stumps in their run to turn periodically for them to get to the critters than collect underneath.  Want to keep them happy since they can't always free range.  Like berry season...first year we had chickens and no contained run they ate about 40 pounds of blueberries.  A painful lesson.  
 
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