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fresh cut bamboo for trellis?

 
gardener
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Some friends have a massive bamboo grove and gave us a bunch of cut pieces to use. I would like to make a trellis out of them for peas this year but am a little worried about the potential for rooting, since most of them were only cut within the last few days. I don't know what species of bamboo it is. Do I need to wait to use them or are they okay now?
 
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I do this all the time and have never had any take root. But, as you say, the tendency could be species specific.
 
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If you're worried, leave them in the sun for 3-5 days until the leaves are nice and wilted. I've never had mine root, but I've usually not stuck it in the ground the same day I chopped it. Normally, it would need some sort of growing point, so you need part of the rhizome, but I'm not familiar with any of the more aggressive bamboos.
 
pollinator
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You could also try burning the ends.
 
Heather Sharpe
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Thanks y'all for the reassurance!

Jay Angler wrote:Normally, it would need some sort of growing point, so you need part of the rhizome, but I'm not familiar with any of the more aggressive bamboos.


That makes sense. I think having seen how crazy a plant it is, I just wanted to be absolutely certain. I already have Japanese knotweed and honeysuckle to contend with, so more plants who are crazy successful and bad at sharing are the last thing I need.  


 
I don't like that guy. The tiny ad agrees with me.
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