• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Stacie Kim
  • Jay Angler

All leaves, no vegetable

 
Posts: 6
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hoping for guidance in my greenhouse garden.  I get all leaves and no produce.
What am I missing in my soil?  I have lots of worms and I mulch with alfalfa and some chop and drop grass and peas and whatever else grows.
Thanks for any suggestions!
 
gardener
Posts: 818
Location: the mountains of western nc
187
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation wood heat
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
what kind of veggies are we talking about? roots, fruits, flowerbuds like broccoli?
 
Posts: 19
Location: Yorkshire, UK 🇬🇧 (Zone 8A, I think)
5
cat urban ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That can be because your soil is high nitrogen, so your plant puts a lot of energy into leafy growth to the detriment of other factors like roots or fruit. I understand this can be common if you use high nitrogen fertilisers, whether that’s something natural like urine, or synthetic ones.
 
N Beirl
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Broccoli, cabbage, peas, kohlrabi, tomatoes, strawberries, anything that isn't (supposed to be so) leafy.  My collard greens, kale, chard lettuces, spinach, cilantro, etc do great.  My soil base is horse manure compost.
 
greg mosser
gardener
Posts: 818
Location: the mountains of western nc
187
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation wood heat
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
yeah, sounds like a high nitrogen, low phosphorus situation. or high pH, where the phosphorus that is present isn’t easily accessible to the plants. how much of a hassle is it to get a soil test done?
 
N Beirl
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I haven't explored getting a soil test locally, but could find out, I'm sure.  I have pH around 7 according to a little meter I picked up at Home depot. How do I make phosphorus available?
 
pollinator
Posts: 253
Location: USDA Zone 8b
43
monies foraging books medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

N Beirl wrote: How do I make phosphorus available?



Well you could add some horse pee to compliment your horse poo.......but it would probably be better to add bone meal, clay or store bought fertilizer such as rock phosphate.

 
N Beirl
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you!  I appreciate your advice!
gift
 
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic