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Can anyone identify this plant?

 
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I've been through all my field guides and websites... but i'm stumped.  Granted, it hasn't flowered yet, but the two distinctly different leaf shapes have me curious. The toothed leaves look a little like a ragwort, and then, it looks a little like pilewort... except the leaves are basal... it looks a little like several things and very familiar... but I can't identify it!

IMG_0187.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0187.JPG]
 
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To be honest? There are a few local to me wild plants that have similar growth habits. They start off with a basal "plate" looking like something, then they seriously put on the growth and the differences emerge.

I'm tempted to say it looks like what I used to call "Texas Dandelion" which is similar in habit and develops annoying little prickles on leaf midribs and the stem. (The plant is also called "Prickly Lettuce" according to the Internet. Lactuca serriola sp.)
https://www.weedimages.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=5918
 
Judson Carroll
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Kristine Keeney wrote:To be honest? There are a few local to me wild plants that have similar growth habits. They start off with a basal "plate" looking like something, then they seriously put on the growth and the differences emerge.

I'm tempted to say it looks like what I used to call "Texas Dandelion" which is similar in habit and develops annoying little prickles on leaf midribs and the stem. (The plant is also called "Prickly Lettuce" according to the Internet. Lactuca serriola sp.)
https://www.weedimages.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=5918



I think the plant you mean is krigia.  This could be some variety of krigia, but the leaves look different than any I've seen in my area.  I guess we'll find out when it flowers.
 
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Are the leaves prickly where you can't pull the plant without getting stuck by the prickles?

My guess would be when it blooms it is sow thistle.  Which is the plant taking over my patio this year.

I am not sure how to tell the difference between prickly lettuce or sow thistle.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sow_thistle
 
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Anne Miller wrote:Are the leaves prickly where you can't pull the plant without getting stuck by the prickles?

My guess would be when it blooms it is sow thistle.  Which is the plant taking over my patio this year.

I am not sure how to tell the difference between prickly lettuce or sow thistle.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sow_thistle



Nope, not sow thistle or prickly lettuce. - not prickly at all  It is becoming quite the mystery!
 
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Might be a sisymbrium of some sort - tumble mustard or false London rocket maybe? What region are you located in?

Sisymbrium Wikipedia
 
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Jennifer Kowalski wrote:Might be a sisymbrium of some sort - tumble mustard or false London rocket maybe? What region are you located in?

Sisymbrium Wikipedia



I took the photo in the sandhills of North Carolina (USA).  I've never seen this plant in the mountains where I live.
 
Jennifer Kowalski
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This guy had a similar-looking s. loeselli plant - his “mid-April” shot is from a bit further along, but shows a lot of those leaf features.

http://www.robsplants.com/plants/SisymLoese

C41A0F99-6D08-4209-90A2-68F06292106A.jpeg
[Thumbnail for C41A0F99-6D08-4209-90A2-68F06292106A.jpeg]
 
Judson Carroll
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Jennifer Kowalski wrote:This guy had a similar-looking s. loeselli plant - his “mid-April” shot is from a bit further along, but shows a lot of those leaf features.

http://www.robsplants.com/plants/SisymLoese


Thanks, I think we'll just have to wait on it a little longer.
 
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I agree wait for it to flower.

My second guess might be false dandelion.
 
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At first glance I thought false dandelion too, but those extra lobes on the toothed parts of the leaves (I really need to learn the correct botanical terms for these things!) aren't something I usually see on a false dandelion.
Though what is commonly known as a false dandelion there may not be the same as what I know as a false dandelion!

It's annoying me and I keep coming back to look at Judson's photo. I feel like I know what plant it is, but just can't bring it to mind! Maybe ragwort, or something related from the senecio family? They have those leaves with lobes on lobes.  Great nectary, but toxic to cattle and horses. But I see that was mentioned already, and you don't think that's it. Gotta love these mystery plants!
 
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The zoom feature here on permies is very cool, BTW!  The more I look at it , the more I realize there are 3 leaf shapes on this one plant.  The lowest leaves are oval with small, like dentate teeth.  The middle leaves are lance shaped with tiny, barely noticeable teeth.  The upper leaves are long with deeply cut teeth like dandelion.  It gets curioser and curioser! The leaf texture is like garden sage.  I hope it isn't like a watched pot, I'm ready to see the flowers!
 
Judson Carroll
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Mystery solved, it is Packera anonyma:  https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/packera-anonyma/

Thanks!
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