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Help rooting an English walnut clipping

 
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A few years ago an absolutely BELOVED English walnut tree here on our farm split down to the base of the trunk during an ice storm.  It revealed a large rotten portion of the main trunk. (We’ve only lived here nine years, but a neighboring farmer told me that tree was approximately 60 years old.)

I convinced my husband to leave about 3 feet of both pieces of trunk in place, hoping that it might sprout new branches. I was delighted to see some suckers sprout over the last 2 growing seasons.

We have purchased a new farm and will be moving this fall. I REALLY want to try to root a number of the branches to plant at the new farm. I tried creating willow water and putting a few branches in that but that was a total failure.

The only routing powder I have on hand does not seem to support barked branches.

I’ve done a few searches here on the tree for him and can’t find any recommendations for how to route branches from an English walnut. Any suggestions please?
 
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Kept moist!! and it should stay alive.
 
Shelley Senkbeil
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The branches/suckers are growing from the old trunk. I’ve been nervous about cutting and potting them.

Will they grow roots if I simply cut them and put them in potting soil? Or should I put them in water first to root?

I’ve done several searches but cannot find anything specific to rooting English walnut clippings.

The original tree was such a glorious and beautiful tree. I’m old enough I’ll never see another grow to that magnificence, but I need to try to. I’m positive whomever buys this place we’re moving from will see the split stump with the suckers as an eyesore and remove it. ☹️
 
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I don't think you can root walnut. Otherwise why would they graft them.
 
Shelley Senkbeil
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OK I would love some input on that from other folks. The reason being this tree, unless it was grafted WAY below ground, sure looks like a tree grown from a nut or from a cutting.

It was two really large trees attached at about2-3 ft above ground level.  It seems to have rotted between the two trees.

The ice storm weighted the outside branches and it split the trunk at the

Then the two trunks sent up new branches? Suckers? Not sure what they’d be called.

We just got back from errands in town with spagnum moss to try to nick and wrap while still on the tree. AND I’m goino to trim a few and root with rooting compond.
 
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Yeah air layering sounds like it could be a good option. I haven't tried rooting walnuts from cuttings, but have heard they can be hard to root from cuttings. Grafting it onto a wild walnut seedling could also be an option.

Best of luck, would love to hear how it turns out whatever you try!
 
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