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Anything I can do about fruit flies/fungus gnats on indoor oyster log?

 
D Taylor
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I've had this log since early May. Either I over or under watered it, but it didn't amount to more than a few nubs that didn't amount.
I left it alone for a month, and now there's a few medium past prime shrooms, and fruit flies or gnats living in the plastic bubble.

I can't imagine getting rid of the bugs in this damp substrate.
Is there a way to bring it back, even outdoors where nature may control the bugs?

Not wanting to waste it! Thanks.

 
Jami McBride
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Location: PNW Oregon
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Not sure I'm picturing what your describing, but I would suggest you put small clear plastic cups with a few inches of ACV (apple cider vinegar) in them around your log. You can punch a hole in the top of the cups and use string or wire to secure them in place.

You didn't mention if your log is in a green house or just covered in plastic, but if you can get inside your 'plastic bubble' use a vacuum to suck up many of the flies and allow the vinegar to collect the ones you miss.
 
D Taylor
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Thanks. Yes it is in the little plastic tent it came with.
There were so many bugs that there are dozens of dead ones stuck to the block. Pretty gross. Not sure I could eat directly from this block without being grossed out.

Can this log be planted outside? Such as buried in a pile of wood chips? I have piles of very fresh chips, but basically mixed alder/cottonwood/and a bit of spruce/pine/fir mixed in. Some leaves and needles in that mix!

I gather oysters can handle winter outside but need to look that up.
 
Jami McBride
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Location: PNW Oregon
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I'm sorry D, I don't know the details of oyster mushrooms and would have to 'look it up' too.

Maybe someone else with jump in here with some personal experiences - can you post your climate, location or other specifics?
 
Devon Olsen
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Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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as for the bugs idk
but with old "cakes" as they are often called or "LC's" you can start more colonies by either splitting it up into more substrate or burying in substrate, with the two cakes that got bugs on me ( and that i had to leave for a couple weeks) i used one to inoculate another before realizing there was some kind of mold or something growing on the cakes, at which point i just moved on to what i was going to do with the remainders after doing this and i buried one with a strip of cardboard and a pile of woodchips near a spot that collects water during most moderate rains of any kind and when i set the hose down while doing something else outside
the other i put into a currently open hugelkultur bed and threw a few shovelfuls of woodchips over it
both were just beginning to fruit again but i had to leave town so well just have to see if they survive winter and produce anything next year...

one of the coolest things about mushrooms imho is that it only takes a few cc's of spores to establish acres of mushrooms because every bit of "old" worn out substrate can be used as spawn to innoculate even more mushroom beds and logs

climate does affect it, and though oysters are QUITE aggressive with their hyphae (or mycelium) they take a week or so to mature and therefore will likely not do well production wise in a climate such as mine that is dry and has low relative humidity a majority of the time, something that can grow in low humidity or quickly may be better suited for fruiting in such a climate
 
David Hartley
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One of the few annoying things about oysters mushrooms they are an incredibly high attractant to fungus gnats!... ACV, aged kombucha and carnivorous plants do help
 
Corey Berman
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Location: Central Illinois
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There are also parasitic nematodes you can water onto areas infested with fungus gnats. They seem to have worked well in the container garden in my room.
http://greenmethods.com/site/biocontrols/nematodes/
 
Shawn Harper
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Location: Portlandia, Oregon
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Wish we could get the slug control namatode.
 
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