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Designs for Non-Potable Rainwater Catchment Systems.

 
Collin Vickers
Posts: 104
Location: Rutledge, MO
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http://youtu.be/KFjvK1TJpME

Credit goes to Mark Lavin of Vertecology.com: http://vertecology.com/

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An alternative, simpler, design:

http://youtu.be/miiyG-LaKFc

Credit goes to Dagoberto Posada

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Another design that allows the catchment system to be perculated through compost to make compost tea, and then run out through an exposed pvc irrigation system:

http://youtu.be/iYmjJCFzYMg

Credit goes to Brian of BSNtech.com: http://www.bsntech.com/
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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we recently built a 7,000 gallon rain catchment cistern for about $1,000. http://www.velacreations.com/blog/item/280-barn-tank.html

we are building another one, this time a potable cistern, 6,000, looks to be about $800.
 
Collin Vickers
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Location: Rutledge, MO
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Looks spiffy, though the advantage of the barrels daisy-chained together is portability.

Is anyone in your actually getting jailed/fined, like one of the commenters on your blog suggests?
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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Collin Vickers wrote:Looks spiffy, though the advantage of the barrels daisy-chained together is portability.

Is anyone in your actually getting jailed/fined, like one of the commenters on your blog suggests?


portability is not an issue with this, you just fold it all up and move it wherever you want. The liners are extremely flexible.

No one is getting jailed for catching rainwater. What they are referring to is a case in Oregon where someone was jailed after blocking tributaries without a permit (his application was denied) and repeated offenses. In my area, we do not have any regulations on rainwater.

Another issue is cost. For barrels (food grade runs about $15/ each) you have a lot more pipe and fittings required, which increase the cost. If I were to make this 7,000 gallon storage out of 55 gallon barrels, it would take 127 of them, at a cost of $1,905 (not counting the multiple trips to get that many to my place). Add on all the connections, etc, and you're well above $2,000.
 
Collin Vickers
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Location: Rutledge, MO
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Wow Abe, that puts things into financial perspective, for sure.

What's the correct term for the type of cistern that you made?

Where did you source the materials?
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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I don't think there is a term for it. Basically it is a EDPM fish safe pond liner (search online) with regular 3"X4" 10 gauge field fence.

You can also get liners that are rated for potable water.

Save some trouble, and make it round, if you do it. It is a lot easier.
 
Collin Vickers
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Location: Rutledge, MO
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I see, it's something like an above-ground pool. Is there a cover of some kind over the top?

Could you discuss the essential differences between the one described in your blog and the potable type that you plan to build?
 
Abe Connally
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we will be putting a greenhouse roof over this one so that we can grow some fish in there.

Here's our current potable one: http://www.velacreations.com/water/water-storage/itemlist/category/97-cisterns.html It's 8 ft tall, 12 ft diameter. The only difference would be the liner. The potable tank has a different kind of liner. For the one we are planning on building in a few weeks, we will make it round (the liner is a cylinder shape), and have an opaque roof.
 
Collin Vickers
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Location: Rutledge, MO
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What is the purpose of the greenhouse roof? It wouldn't increase the temperature too much for the fish in summer?
 
Abe Connally
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We can open the greenhouse cover in the summer, but so far, the water does not increase much in temperature.

It is basically to keep animals out and help keep it a bit warmer in the winter.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Love that self-cleaning overflow!

 
Abe Connally
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I haven't put in the self cleaner on the barn tank, but will do soon. It will be a little different this time, because the floor of this tank has a slight slope to one side. So, I will put in a PVC pipe at the bottom of the slope, with holes drilled on the bottom of the pipe. It then goes up to the overflow, and creates a suction effect every time the tank overflows, which should be fairly often, because it will only require 13 inches of rain to fill it.
 
Andrew Parker
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Abe, did you consider gabion walls for your tank?
 
Abe Connally
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Andrew Parker wrote:Abe, did you consider gabion walls for your tank?


yes, I did, but the cost doesn't work out for us.
 
Collin Vickers
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Location: Rutledge, MO
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Polyethylene sandbags?
 
Abe Connally
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we used a compacted earth method that is faster and cheaper than sand bags: http://www.velacreations.com/shelter/building-components/walls/item/166.html

But, the posts and fence is by far the cheapest and fastest method.
 
Collin Vickers
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Location: Rutledge, MO
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What did you use for the plastic lining in the rapidobe wall?
 
Andrew Parker
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For future reference, where did the cost of gabions go out of budget? Cost of wire? Cost of rocks? Equipment rental?

I was going to suggest that you could use a system resembling the HESCO, http://www.hesco.com/index.asp, system, but without the proprietary spiral pins. It is essentially a gabion made with welded wire panels, with a fabric liner to allow filling with dirt or whatever is available. It is held together with regularly spaced crosspieces made of the same welded wire panel.
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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Collin Vickers wrote:What did you use for the plastic lining in the rapidobe wall?

bill board vinyl

Andrew Parker wrote:For future reference, where did the cost of gabions go out of budget? Cost of wire? Cost of rocks? Equipment rental?

I was going to suggest that you could use a system resembling the HESCO, http://www.hesco.com/index.asp, system, but without the proprietary spiral pins. It is essentially a gabion made with welded wire panels, with a fabric liner to allow filling with dirt or whatever is available. It is held together with regularly spaced crosspieces made of the same welded wire panel.

the wire baskets was where the cost went crazy, plus the extra labor to fill them.

The HESCO barrier is similar to our Rapidobe system, though ours is a lot cheaper!
 
Collin Vickers
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Location: Rutledge, MO
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Have you tried using the rapidobe technique in a load-bearing wall?
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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Collin Vickers wrote:Have you tried using the rapidobe technique in a load-bearing wall?

the wall it is in is load bearing, though it is a metal roof, there is not much load to it.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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