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For Seed Germination Dates by Zip code... For Both Spring and Fall Crops. Follow this link...

 
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Good Day Everyone,

As I am sure a lot of you are aware... it is already time to start germinating veggie seed for next season for parts of the country... and will soon be time for others.

Time to get seeds in-hand and planned

In the following Farmer's Almanac link you can type in your specific zip code to find both your SPRING and FALL crop planting dates.

For instance... It turns out I can get a second crop of Corn in my area if I plant a batch around Jul 27th mark. Of course, in the Fall, you are racing that first frost... which can come either sooner or later than the average date.

Anyways, I printed out my calendar and laminated it. I will keep it forever in case their website breaks. lol

This can save folks decades of learning. Especially the slow learning kind such as myself that can't even hardly remember what varieties of tomatoes they grew the last few seasons. lol

It isn't just dates either... it is also... which seed is best sown directly into the garden and which ones are best to be transplanted. For the ones to be transplanted it gives you the seed start date and the transplant date as well. Just make adjustments for the weather that given year.

The only thing I would say that I do differently is... I just started my scallions/green onions. I am about to start my yellow/white/and red onions as well. They will get transplanted at a decent size into the garden while it is still pretty cold outside. The green onions are going into their own place to perennialize.


https://www.almanac.com/gardening/planting-calendar/zipcode/23322
 
pollinator
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Wow, no wonder I have never grown good bell peppers. The indoor planting date for them in my area is Jan 6-20... NOW!

I feel like I just finished with my Fall/winter garden and now I have to transplant more? (Actually I still need to get some of my Christmas lima beans off the dead vines)

Gee, I kind of wish we had a winter break here... but I do enjoy the warmer temperatures!
 
Marty Mitchell
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It does sound like you live in a great place to grow year round!

I don’t have to start my peppers until Feb 11th or so… and am also still getting lots of kale and carrots from the Fall crop. Bonus is that I have had to do a lick of work for the Fall crop since around November (other than harvest). No watering either.

I have my next two growing seasons planned out already. The garden should be set for this upcoming Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter.

I want to make this the year of the tomatoes at my home. I am really trying ti step up my tomato and bell pepper game.
 
Rebecca Blake
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I got some pepper seed starts going today thanks to you posting this webpage! Yay :D

Hopefully I'll actually have a ~real~ pepper crop this year.
 
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The zip code tool might be new for this year. Happened to notice it for the first time last night. Very useful.

Rebecca, I grew peppers & tomatoes in your area for many years. I would typically get a moderate harvest in spring. Then when summer arrived they would wimp out but barely stay alive with heavy watering. Then about September they would produce many more. Same with eggplant. Have you discovered any wild chili petins? I can point you to some if you want.
 
Marty Mitchell
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Rebecca Blake wrote:I got some pepper seed starts going today thanks to you posting this webpage! Yay :D

Hopefully I'll actually have a ~real~ pepper crop this year.



Awesome! Best of luck this year. Just be sure to check out long-range forecasts right before actually planting… and have either an emergency cover up plan or second set to plant.

If you live somewhere that gets super hot… try adding some deep grass clippings. It will snuff out weeds… fertilize… hold in moisture… and most importantly… keep the soil much cooler.

Which will keep the soil life active, help the plant to keep cool (needing less water and being able to absorb nutrients better).

 
Marty Mitchell
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Mike Barkley wrote:The zip code tool might be new for this year. Happened to notice it for the first time last night. Very useful.



It was there last year as well. However, they changed the layout this year. Probably so it would be easier to find.

I do hope this years garden will be the best ever!
 
Rebecca Blake
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Mike Barkley wrote:Rebecca, I grew peppers & tomatoes in your area for many years. I would typically get a moderate harvest in spring. Then when summer arrived they would wimp out but barely stay alive with heavy watering. Then about September they would produce many more. Same with eggplant. Have you discovered any wild chili petins? I can point you to some if you want.



That sounds about right... my friend's peppers were still going strong well into November and I was very shocked! It was an unusually rainy summer this past year.. super unfortunate I was too sick to do much of anything I really missed out on the good season. Praying for another one like it this year!

When you say they produce many more in September are these the same plants or are they new transplants you put in?

I'd love to hear about the wild chili petins :) My neighbor has something that looks like it I actually brought some home one day but my sister was very adamant I don't just take random plants when I'm not 100% sure what they are and try to grow and eat them.... particularly peppers since there are also ornamental varieties, which I get... but now that I'm looking at pics of chili petin online again they sure do look the same. Wish I had kept those seeds! argh.
 
Mike Barkley
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The same tomato & pepper plants.

Look at the stems of the chili petin plants. Check if they grow zig zaggedy. If so, it's probably chili petin. Never saw anything with stems like that that wasn't.
 
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