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The Invasive Brazilian Peppertree

 
Posts: 17
Location: Climate Zone 9b
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hugelkultur forest garden ungarbage
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I recently just bought a house and All the plants/trees that came with it are going to petty much be part of my permaculture efforts. Except for this stubborn Brazillian Peppertree that seems to lay waste to everything it touches. The ground beneath it refuses to allow anything else to live, and it's attacking it's neighbors throughout it's shortened time left in the backyard.

Is there anything a brazillian Peppertree is useful for? When I do research on the wood, and the bark or leaves. Anything. It just comes back with "poisonous/harmful/invasive"

I'm getting rid of it regardless, but I was just wondering if even the chips I'll make out of the fallen branches will even be useful in the garden. Otherwise I'll just scrap the entire thing.

Any suggestions would be super cool. I want to do SOMETHING with it, but I don't think I have much options.
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steward
Posts: 14997
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4128
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Stephen Herrod Buhner in his book Herbal Antibiotics said "Invasive plants are Earth's way of insisting we notice her medicines."

Often many plants are misunderstood. And this tree has many benefits.

Culinary Uses

   Berries are used to make syrups, vinegar, and beverages because of the spicy flavor.
   It can be added to wines and used as a pepper.
   Seeds can be used as a spice, adding a pepper-like taste to food.
   In some countries, dried and ground berries are used as a pepper substitute or as an adulterant of black pepper (Piper nigrum).




Traditional uses and benefits of Brazilian pepper tree

   Liquid tincture from the bark is used as a stimulant and tonic.
   It has been used as a diuretic and for the treatment of tumors.
   Remedial healers have used it topically for gout, syphilis, as well as cases or rheumatism.
   Other folk healers recommend the leaves and fruit to be added to baths to help heal open wounds or ulcers on the body.
   South African people steep the leaves and make a tea to heal colds faster.
   Dried leaves are used in Argentina for respiratory and urinary infections.
   Brazilian peppertree is described to be an astringent, antibacterial, diuretic, digestive stimulant, tonic, antiviral, and wound healer.
   Sap is used as a mild laxative and a diuretic, and the entire plant is used externally for fractures and as a topical antiseptic in Peru.
   Entire plant is used externally for fractures and as a topical antiseptic.
   Oleoresin is used externally as a wound healer, to stop bleeding, and for toothaches, and it is taken internally for rheumatism and as a purgative.
   Leaf tea is used to treat colds, and a leaf decoction is inhaled for colds, hypertension, depression, and irregular heartbeat in South Africa.
   Bark tea is used as a laxative, and a bark-and-leaf tea is used as a stimulant and antidepressant in Brazilian amazon.
   Decoction is made with the dried leaves and is taken for menstrual disorders and is also used for respiratory and urinary tract infections and disorders in Argentina.
   It is used for many conditions in the tropics, including menstrual disorders, bronchitis, gingivitis, gonorrhea, gout, eye infections, rheumatism, sores, swellings, tuberculosis, ulcers, urethritis, urogenital disorders, venereal diseases, warts, and wounds. In Brazilian herbal medicine today, the dried bark and/or leaves are employed for heart problems (hypertension and irregular heart beat), infections of all sorts, and menstrual disorders with excessive bleeding, tumors, and general inflammation.
   Liquid extract or tincture prepared with the bark is used internally as a stimulant, tonic, and astringent, and externally for rheumatism, gout, and syphilis.
   Brazilian pepper tree has been used as a remedy for ulcers, respiratory problems, wounds, rheumatism, gout, diarrhea, skin ailments and arthritis, as well as to treat tumors and leprosy in folk medicines.
   Stem bark is used to treat inflammations, scabies, sore throat and itching.



https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/brazilian-pepper-tree/
 
Jøhn Kaltenbrüner
Posts: 17
Location: Climate Zone 9b
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Anne Miller wrote:Stephen Herrod Buhner in his book Herbal Antibiotics said "Invasive plants are Earth's way of insisting we notice her medicines."

Often many plants are misunderstood. And this tree has many benefits.




https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/brazilian-pepper-tree/



that's amazing! thank you! I'll have to redo my plan then! I honestly could find absolutely nothing positive about it. Plus, the area surrounding the pepper-tree having sparse vegetation was not helping. I read somewhere that the tree can have the  "the allelopathic effect" on the surrounding plants

 
pollinator
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Location: Appalachian Foothills-Zone 7
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Biochar is a great place for invasives!
 
pollinator
Posts: 151
Location: MD, USA. zone 7
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Whatever you do, don't burn it! The smoke will make you suffer. And for the same reason be careful about skin contact with the sap, it can cause rashes and such.
 
Anne Miller
steward
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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John said, " I read somewhere that the tree can have the  "the allelopathic effect" on the surrounding plants



I used to feel that way about my juniper cedar trees until someone posted a picture of something growing directly in the cedar leaves.

I feel it is mostly the shade that trees cast that gives them a bad rap.

I have a birdseed food plot growing under my cedar tree.
 
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