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biodynamics, differently

 
Posts: 39
Location: Finland, MN
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I'm going to use aspects of biodynamics but I'm not crazy about some of the stuff involved. I'm not chasing down a red stag for its bladder and whatnot. Nor am I starting a compost. Why can't I just grow the herbs n flowers and chop n drop? Why can't I mess with goats rather than behemoth cows? Four stomachs make a difference? Maybe I won't see the gnomes, I'm over that part.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 11352
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
738
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
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Frolf Lundgren wrote:Four stomachs make a difference?



Goats are also ruminants, with four chambers to the stomach.
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Frolf, I'd hazard a guess that you share my outlook of "why bother with X if Y works fine?"
For me, I 'get' permaculture and bd's shared aspects, such as sensitivity and respect for nature's cycles, influences and complexities.
I can't imagine being organised, or whatever, enough to bother with the bd preps.
But the best looking plants and healthiest stock I've seen have been on biodynamic land....
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
23
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i am so convinced that the food forest thing is the right thing for my property, but I do feel that learning more about biodynamics might give me some knmowledge that might increase my yields and health of my property..but I'm sticking witih the no till food forest garden..and adding in any good bits i learn.

I'm one of those eat the wheat and throw out the chaff types of persons.

I do know that the moon does effect things esp in Michigan in June when we get a hard freeze at a full moon nearly every single year..so I'm willing to learn a little more
 
Posts: 52
Location: north Georgia
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I just read the 1924 Steiner agricultural lectures and am almost finished "Secrets of the Soil" for which I thank Brenda for the recommendation. Though I am not at the astral forces stage, I think there are, for me, some practical takeaways. For example the dispersion of microbes into the soil. In the past I would allow my compost to finish processing and then perhaps store it a while on a tarp, to prevent tree roots accessing the nutrients. Both bad practices, I now conclude. If the compost is allowed to fully process then the microbes doing the processing will likely die and, if the compost is on a tarp, the earth worms and other life elements will have difficulty returning to the soil. Also, without true contact with the soil, moisture and other types of microbes cannot move into the heap. So now, when the compost is almost ready and is still actively processing, though at a much slower rate, I add it to the soil. And yesterday, when I transplanted a few blackberries, instead of trenching in their roots, adding compost and then watering, I added compost and chicken manure to the bucket half filled with water, swirled it a bit with a stick, soaked the roots of the plants in the mix and then, after layering down the roots, applied the liquid mix to them. Common sense you may say, but I needed the readings to get me thinking.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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I too gleaned a few things from secrets of the soil that I'll be using, but mostly I got a good quality moon calendar for 2013 and will be using that..hopefully it will make a difference
 
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