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How can chloramine be filtered out?  RSS feed

 
Ben Mosley
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Location: Upstate,SC Zone 7a
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For those that don't know.Chloramine is a mix of chlorine and ammonia to treat water for pathogens.It last longer in water than straight chlorine.Therefore allowing the water to move further away from the treatment facility before becoming tainted by the pipes.

I tried a little experiment recently for a week and the results were shocking.I have been suffering from IBS,pancreatitis,and acid reflux along with a persistent skin irritation.After one week of using distilled well water some of my digestive symptoms improved and my skin condition nearly went away.So now I am trying to come up with a way to filter the crap out without spending $30,000 on a system specifically to remove chloramine.It doesn't evaporate out like chlorine and it can be filtered like ammonia.I don't know enough about water systems to know what I need to clean up the water quality.So how do i rid myself of chloramine tainted water.Florine/floride is another concern also.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Carbon filter should work.

Reverse osmosis is about the only way to deal with fluoride. Luckily my water co. doesn't add it.
 
Ben Mosley
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Location: Upstate,SC Zone 7a
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Thanks.I knew it wasn't going to take a system that cost $10k to $30k.I felt like I was being played for a fool.
 
John Polk
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Multiple methods described here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chloramine#Removing_chloramines_from_water

 
Robin william
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Chloramine is a combination of chlorine and ammonia, and is used to disinfect water supplies. But is is respiratory irritant with trichloramine being the most toxic. Ultraviolet UV light treatment and chlorine dioxide are used to remove this toxin from water. However I prefer consuming bottled water instead of community water as it is safer and healthier option.
 
Adam Poddepie
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I know Amazon has a counter top distiller that does about a gallon at a time. Perhaps go with one of those? I think they're around 100 bucks.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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I just came across this: http://www.amazon.com/Rio-2000-Ceramic-Sterasyl-Filters/dp/B000VDTJ7G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354371790&sr=8-1&keywords=daulton+rio+2000

WHOLE HOUSE BERKEY!!!

It is just the ticket for a pressurized rainwater collection system. It still doesn't have the flouride filters, though
 
Ben Mosley
Posts: 51
Location: Upstate,SC Zone 7a
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If you ready the wiki posted above,it can't be distilled out of the water.It seems that some sort of organic compound must come in contact with it and bond to it.Then it will drop out or can be filtered out.I am looking into quite a few solutions to the problem.I would re-drill our well.We are on city water because our wells are contaminated from all the septic systems that have sprung up in our area from all the new developments.
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 563
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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bump

Anyone know if "campden tablets" are a reasonable option? cost-wise I think this would be reasonable (about 1 tablet/day, so about $6/year), but I don't know if this would be adding another chemical problem to my compost and soil: they are sodium metabisulfate or potassium metabisulfate:


Or has anyone figured out a way to get enough UV from sun to handle it?? how much time does it need in the sun? at what point does it become an easier option to dress up as a ninja and break into the municipal water supply and switch out their chloramine supply for something harmless?


from wikipedia "Chloramine":

Ultraviolet light[edit]
The use of ultraviolet (UV) light for chlorine or chloramine removal is an established technology that has been widely accepted in pharmaceutical, beverage, and dialysis applications.[15] UV is also used for disinfection at aquatic facilities.

Superchlorination[edit]
Chloramine can be removed from tap water by treatment with superchlorination (10 ppm or more of free chlorine, such as from a dose of sodium hypochlorite bleach or pool sanitizer) while maintaining a pH of about 7 (such as from a dose of hydrochloric acid). Hypochlorous acid from the free chlorine strips the ammonia from the chloramine, and the ammonia outgasses from the surface of the bulk water. This process takes about 24 hours for normal tap water concentrations of a few ppm of chloramine. Residual free chlorine can then be removed by exposure to bright sunlight for about 4 hours.[citation needed]

and how do you make activated carbon?

is it really worth just getting a berkey and filtering all my gray water? doesn't that seem kinda lame? does any plant sequester this stuff? any fungus? bacterium? opisthokont? benevolent alien?
 
Joy Oasis
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How much I understand vit c powder reacts with chloramines and makes them into nontoxic compound. People add about a teaspoon of powder to neutralize bath water, which is about 25-30 gallons, isn't it? It will change the taste of the water -either will make it a bit sour (if using ascorbic acid) or a bit salty (if using sodium ascorbate). There are also other forms of vit c, but they are rare and much more expensive.
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 563
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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Well with a name like "Joy Oasis" you've got to be the person to listen to on this!  wow, we just happen to have a big ole bag of ascorbic acid in teh basement.  this is for the garden, will that be a problem for the microbiome?

Joy Oasis wrote:How much I understand vit c powder reacts with chloramines and makes them into nontoxic compound. People add about a teaspoon of powder to neutralize bath water, which is about 25-30 gallons, isn't it? It will change the taste of the water -either will make it a bit sour (if using ascorbic acid) or a bit salty (if using sodium ascorbate). There are also other forms of vit c, but they are rare and much more expensive.
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 563
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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Ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate[edit]
Ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate completely neutralize both chlorine and chloramine, but degrade in a day or two, which makes them usable only for short-term applications. SFPUC determined that 1000 mg of Vitamin C tablets, crushed and mixed in with bath water, completely remove chloramine in a medium-size bathtub without significantly depressing pH.[21]


(From wikipedia) --so this means the vitamin C breaks down and releases the chloramine back into the wild, yes?
 
Joy Oasis
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I know, that vit c mixed with water is not effective for healing after about half an hour, but that is because it reacts and changes, I don't think that means, that chloramines get formed again, but I do not know. Where did you find that information and what do they say specifically about that?
As far as plants go, I don't think it would affect microorganisms much as amount is quite small, but I am not sure.
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