• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Hugelkultur from yard and shrubbery cuttings

 
Henry N. Lawrence Iii
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can I put my yard and shrubbery cuttings into my hugleculture bed?
Have a huge pile which also contains tree limb cuttings as well.
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Pie
Posts: 3182
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
141
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I renamed the thread to something more descriptive.

Do you have any pictures of what you want to put in your hugelkultur raised garden beds?
 
Henry N. Lawrence Iii
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No photos but it is primarily palm, azalea,oak, and other trimmings from my yard. Some weeds and vines also, which was my main concern since I don't want to propogate weeds and annoying thorny vines by including them in my hugleculture pile. Does this help?
 
garrett lacey
Posts: 72
Location: Edmonton Alberta
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I work as a tree pruner in the winter and have hugel'd all kinds of mixed up branches, seemed to work just fine. If you suspect that a certain annoying plant may develop adventitious roots in the pile, i would try to avoid it: some mountain ash branches that were sticking out of one of my piles actually leafed out and flowered last year because of the moisture inside the hugelbed.
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
leave any vines out to dry in the sun at least a week first.

you also want to throw in some forest leaf litter that is still moist. (and in the dark too).

you need to get some fungi in there to break down the antioxidants in the plant material, so the bacteria can make food out of the rest. the colors in leaves and branches are antioxidants, and will kill bacteria, so you need to start with fungi. they use them as food, and the leftovers go to the bacteria...

if you have palms, you should be burying, to use as soil water canteens, instead of piles. piles dry out quickly, which is why they were used in deep forest lands.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic