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Juglone tolerant plants

 
gardener
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We are lucky to have a huge beautiful English walnut tree in our yard, but sadly  we lost two good sized limbs this summer.  I am going to start a hugelkultur and would like to use the unusable parts of the limbs to the bottom of my bed.  I keep reading conflicting info on the web about English walnut.  I hate to waist any of that wood, but don't want to create a hugelkultur that wont be productive. Has anyone used English walnut, or know if I should use it, or be safe and put it in the burn pile? I would be grateful for any help.  Thanks
 
pollinator
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I would use it if it was all I had;  leave the branches whole and put them at the very bottom. It should break down slowly enough that the juglone shouldn't really be a problem.

I'm not an expert at hugelkultur however, and the ones I made haven't particularly been successful, though they aren't as big and steep as Sepp Holzer recommends, which may be my problem.  Good luck!
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Thank you.  I think I will make two small Hugelkultur mounds, one with walnut and one without.  I think it will be interesting to see what happens.
 
pollinator
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You might plant mostly Juglone tolerant plants for a year or two. https://extension.psu.edu/landscaping-and-gardening-around-walnuts-and-other-juglone-producing-plants

There are other lists that don’t precisely agree with this list.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Thank you so much. I have been so focused on if I should or should not use walnut, it didn't even occur to me to check out what plants are tolerant to juglone.  I think I will still do two hugelkultur mounds and put the English walnut in one and other wood in the other.  It will be interesting to see what differences there are.  It's so nice to know no matter what the out come of my little experiment is there are many plants Juglone tolerant I would have planted any way.  It's true sometimes you really can't see the forest for the trees.  Thanks for your help.
 
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I love the duel-trial research idea!  Two mounds, identical plantings . . . and see if there is any measurable difference.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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Thank you so much.  I have been so focused on if I should or should not use walnut, it didn't even occur to me to check out what plants are tolerant to juglone.  I think I will still do two hugelkultur mounds and put the English walnut in one and other wood in the other. It will be interesting to see what differences there are, but it's so nice to know there are plants I would plant anyway that can go in the walnut hugelkultur no matter what the out come of my little experiment is.  It's true sometimes you can't see the forest through the trees.  Thanks for your help.
 
gardener
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From what I understand currants and persimmon (American probably best for this) are good choices. A lot of university lists of juglone tolerant plants conflict
 
pollinator
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i've got blackcaps (wild black raspberries) growing happily under some of my black walnuts, and have been having great success mulching young pawpaws with black walnut hulls. i can second persimmons as being tolerant.

to be honest, i doubt you'll see that much effect at all if you're just talking about using the wood in a hugel. in my experience exudates from the living roots and possibly large amounts of leaves breaking down are more likely to cause harm to juglone-sensitive plants. i personally might think twice, but probably not more, about using chipped walnut wood as mulch relatively indiscriminately.
 
steward
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I'm thinking a wiki thread that lists all the permie plants that work under a walnut would be wonderful.  Ideally based on experiences that people here have had, not based on lists online.  In fact, I think I'll start one...
 
pioneer
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I read that mulberry trees are used as a juglone barrier between walnuts and the rest of your garden.
 
Mike Haasl
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I think I've heard that too Ben.  Can anyone out there confirm that it actually works?
 
pioneer & author
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A few more for the list

 I would love to plant walnut tree that one day becomes majestic. Currently I have filled up every area I have a direct control over with other nut trees and cider apples. I would then like to live long enough to enjoy the nuts. I have a few juglone resistant plants here and these plants also have valuable features for humans. I expect it would need some more research to confirm it beyond doubt. Sometimes there is a very narrow line between incorrect folklaw and science. Having geekish tendencies I would like to know the repertoire of biochemical etc. responses that these species use to deal with juglone, but unfortunately, at least today, I have more pressing matters to attend to.

Sweet Cicely / Myrrhis odorata (edible, medicinal), Sweet Woodruff / Galium odoratum (edible, medicinal), Toothwort / Dentaria spp (edible), Wild Ginger / Asarum europaeum (medicinal), Yarrow / Achillea millifolium (medicinal)
How to Have an Edible Garden Under Black Walnut Trees

Sweet-Cicely.jpg
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Sweet Cicely
black-walnut-arboretum-web.jpg
[Thumbnail for black-walnut-arboretum-web.jpg]
A beautiful Walnut tree
 
Mike Haasl
steward
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Ok, I started a wiki list here: Juglone Sensitivity List  

If you'd like to share plants that you've had experience with that either like or don't like living near a walnut, please post it over there.  Let's do this
 
Jen Fulkerson
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After one year I can say even with all the difficulty I have had keeping soil on my hugel (thank you chickens)  I can see no difference between the walnut hugel and the non walnut hugel.  I tried to plant some of the same veggies in the same way, and both sides preformed equally.  Being in California, and a relatively new hugel I did have to water, but only a couple times a month compared to every 3 to 4 days in my raised beds. That is a huge improvement, and I have hopes next year will be even better.  At least from my little experiment using English walnut wood in a hugelkultur isn't a problem.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
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Jen, how tall are your raised beds?  Our summers are really dry here and city water is kind of expensive. I have found that just 4-6 inches is high enough to let them dry out faster in the spring without making them need much extra water in the summer. Tall raised beds are much better if you have back problems.
 
Jen Fulkerson
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I have several different raised beds.  I had 4" bed kit I got on clearance one year.   This is not deep enough in my opinion. I bought 4"x5' fence boards and added them to the top.  That makes them 8" deep.  I am slowly changing my raised beds to hugel beets, I love then, and don't have to water nearly as much. But it's a lot of work, and where I live I can garden year round, so that makes for a narrow window of time to get it done.
 
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Location: Northeastern N.D.
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Hello all---
I am new to this site as a participant, though I have been a reader for about a year. For my first post I would like to add a bit of information on the topic of juglone tolerance, which is simply that the Morton Arboretum site (mortonarb.org) has a lengthy list of juglone tolerant plants. They also list some intolerant plants. Just type "juglone" into the search box and it should take you to that topic.
 
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