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Grass Growing Problems.

 
Jeremiah wales
Posts: 137
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Hi, Not sure if this is a place that I can find this answer. But I am hoping.
I have purchased an old homestead that has run wild for 30 years. What was once yard (lawn) is now 30% lawn and 70% weeds of all kinds. I understand that I can use a Selective Herbicide or Broadleaf Killer. But I am trying not to use chemicals, If I dont have to. How can I get rid of the weeds and get the % to 80% grass and less weeds? Anyone?

Second thing is there are Huge Pine trees on the north side of the place. Any grown is slim under those trees or 30 feet away. I have been told that If I rake out the pine needles and sprinkle lime or wood ash on top of that area every six months. It will reduce the Acid in the soil which grass does not like. Does that really work?
I am just trying to get it a little more like a Park atmosphere near the house.
Anyone?

Thanks in advance for any comments !
 
Tyrr Vangeel
Posts: 39
Location: Mol, Belgium
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chicken dog forest garden
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mowing will help a lot against your weeds

the ash or lime will reduce acidity and therefore give more plants an opportunity. egg shells or mussels or something like that will also work, but slower --> less agressive in the beginning, but also much more constant, what your grass will like more.

Or grow some acidity loving plants over there?

As you are 'complaining' about trees in the north, I suppose you are in southern hemisphere?
in other words, do the trees are in the sunpath or is the sun comming under the branches?

strawberries like it a little bit acid, but they also need sunlight!

ow, and I forgot, 'weed' does not exist
except the stuff some people smoke
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I would recommend replacing the weeds with edibles like strawberries, currants, blueberry, mint, thyme, lavender, garlic, onions.
Apples, Plums, Peaches, Grapes, Kiwi, Figs, Pomegranate, Apricots, Almond, Mulberry.

Here is alist of other fruits and nuts that you can put in the weedy areas, that the grass doesn't like.
http://www.onegreenworld.com//index.php?cPath=1

Tell me which fruit/nut you saw that you did not know about before.
 
John Brownlee
Posts: 99
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Jeremiah,

I grow grass for a living, I've been working in lawn care for almost 7 years. My advice is don't try to grow grass in the shade or in the acid soil under any type of pine tree. those are not the type of areas where grass is meant to grow.

What you should do is have the soil tested in the open sunny areas where you want to have a nice lawn. Then apply wood ashes instead of lime at half the rate that is recommended for the lime to be applied. Most grasses grow best at a Ph of around 7.
Then topdress the area with compost (preferably homemade but take what you can get). Then cut the grass every 5 days with a mulching blade on the mower, don't ever bag the grass clippings unless you're going to use them to make compost.
Only water the lawn when the grass blades begin to wilt or the top 2 inches of soil is dry to the touch.
I know this sounds like kind of a long process, but in the end, you will have a really nice looking organic and mostly weed free lawn.

If it were me I would plant a bunch of trees.
I hate grass
 
laura sharpe
Posts: 244
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I dont know what i can say which john did not say above except do not cut the grass too short. Healthy well fed grass will out compete the weeds. Feeding the grass and cutting it will help the grass and hurt the weeds. When keeping your choices natural, some weeds will always be there but not so many you could not live with them.

you might want to plant some clover into the grass yourself. just mow it with the grass but it will feed the grass. I think it looks wonderful.
 
John Brownlee
Posts: 99
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Laura,

You are right, cutting the grass tall is probably the number 1 most important thing to do for your lawn. the basic rule of thumb is to cut no more than 1 third of the green at each cutting.
 
Sherry Jansen
Posts: 59
Location: Southern MN
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I guess the general rule is to: Cut the Weed before it goes to Seed.

Not sure what kind of grasses you have, but No Mow Grass can crowd down many weeds and can grow so thick that weed seeds can reach the ground to germinate.

Another trick to improve the soil is plant clover in with the grasses. Though most clovers grow taller than the No Mow Grass , if the area gets any traffic, it kinda dwarfs it. Having chickens, goats or small livestock ranging the clover also helps keep it down.

 
Randy Fisher
Posts: 21
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John Brownlee wrote:Jeremiah,

I grow grass for a living, I've been working in lawn care for almost 7 years. My advice is don't try to grow grass in the shade or in the acid soil under any type of pine tree. those are not the type of areas where grass is meant to grow.


You need to come tell my grass this since its growing in the shade, on its own, and in the middle of a large pine forest.

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