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Seeking orchard advice for central Spain which trees would you put closest to the stream?

 
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Location: Barcelona
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I'm looking at a property with about six acres cleared to nearly flat arable dry land with a small stream running north to south through the middle of it for passive watering. It also has about four acres of pines at its margins. If we buy it, my long term plan will be a mixed herbal ley with deep rooting dry climate favorites like chickory, cocksfoot, and perennial ryes to establish sheep pasture. Off grid-electric fencing ideally.

I'd also like to put in orchard trees like apricot, almond, fig, mullberry, apple, pomegranate, lemon...ideally they'll get a significant head start on the sheep. I'm trying to figure out the mojo on placement and which should be guilded together or kept separate. My husband has an allergy to olive pollen so that's the only one to definitely leave out of the mix.

Can I please also have your opinons/research on which trees should get priority for placement closest to the stream? Like, is there a known hierarchy for which mediterranean climate crop trees need the best proximity to water? My gut says apples and figs would be thirstiest (and apples might not really belong) but I think that the orchard would be apricot heavy since those are harvested in the months we're most likely to be able to be at the property if we get it. My twins are 9 and I'm imagining retiring/summering in/near one of the tiny towns with fewer than 100 residents once the kids are into higher education. If I start the trees soon that timing should work nicely :)

 
pollinator
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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Observations around the area may be a good idea or discussions with local farmers.
Does the stream run continuously?
Can you draw from the stream, sometimes you need permits etc?
 
steward
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Do you plan on having any nut trees?  Where I live pecan are grown neat the river and streams.

Of your list, I would think that mulberry trees would like to be close to water.

 
gardener
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Location: Málaga, Spain
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Hi.
Almonds, pommegrenate and figs require almost no water. Apples you should investigate first, because they might not belong, as you said. Consider jujube instead, it gives small apples that are less productive, but tastes great.

About olive trees, I'm also allergic to it, but if you don't plant too many, that wouldn't be an issue, and it's just a sneezing week. A few table olives are great to have!

If they don't let you touch the stream, maybe you can throw some stones and branches in low depth places, looking like debris, as a sort of check dams.
 
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