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elaeagnus x ebingei

 
pollinator
Posts: 1376
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
18
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I think elaeagnus are very desirable because they are supposed to fruit early in the season. But there are only very few plants available in Australia and none is selected for fruiting. There is one Elaeagnus x ebbingei "limelight" available, is this suitable as fruit? It is sold as a hedge plant.
Otherwise I can import seeds from the following eleaegnus:
Elaeagnus angustifolia

Elaeagnus multiflora

Elaeagnus pungens

Elaeagnus umbellata
are these fruits worthwhile from seed?
 
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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I have no personal experience with this, but here is a link you will probably find useful: http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Elaeagnus+x+ebbingei
 
gardener
Posts: 856
Location: South Puget Sound, Salish Sea, Cascadia, North America
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I have sold and grown E. ebbingei, but didn't eat the fruit at the time. It didn't strike me as very prolific or the fruit very reliable. I DO grow E. multiflora, and find it very useful, it freezes nicely and is very fast to harvest despite berries the size of wild huckleberries. There have been some improved varieties out there. Mine are seedlings and very late ripening (which might be due to my climate.) It might disperse aggressively in the right climate.
 
Posts: 146
Location: Southern Appalachia
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I wish I knew what species it is, but I've found an evergreen Elaeagnus in a nearby city that has fruited the past two years in January in zone 6. It's not extremely prolific, but more than I've heard reported for ebingei.

I'd say they're definitely worthwhile from seed, just start way more than you have room for, select any that you like, chop and drop the rest. Even if you get no fruit you'll get the nitrogen and carbon fixation.

peace
 
pollinator
Posts: 1877
Location: La Palma (Canary island) Zone 11
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Angelika, can you import trees from England or not?
If yes, I have an address.

I will plant e. x e. just because my climate is too cool for others.
It is great as it fixes nitrogen.
 
Posts: 4
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Does anyone know a source for Elaeagnus macrophylla?  They have great edible nuts and berries.
 
Your mother was a hamster and your father was a tiny ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
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