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Barrel Woodstove-Cabin experience  RSS feed

 
Jeremiah wales
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[size=12][size=18][size=12]I am putting this under wood burning stoves, Since we are not talking about a Rocket Heater here.
Last weekend I went up to a Cabin we have in Northern Wisconsin. One mile walk in to our place off of the blacktop road. We had not been into the place for several months. It is a basic cabin we were working on. (Although it had electric in it and a basic emergency Propane space heater).
I arrived at 8pm it was dark and 20 degrees. My plan was to turn on the lights and get a propane heater going to take the chill off the place and settle in for the night. Well so much for that. Someone had broke in and stolen the copper wire on the walls and stolen the small propane tanks.
I hauled an old barrel wood stove into the place,opened a window cut a hole in a piece of plywood with a handsaw to get a exhaust pipe set up. The pipe came out of the flange on the berrel stove. Had a 12" vertical rise to a 90 elbow to horizontal pipe which was 60" long to another 90 elbow and then vertical pipe 9 feet up. This is all the pipe I had to work with. everything was non insulated pipe. At first I had some smokeback. But once I got the fire going it was ok. I used this stove to heat the place for 8 days while I stayed there and worked on the place.
Now the wood that was available to me was not green wood. Much of it was old firewood that had been covered for several years and some had been cut up 6 months earlier. It was not completely Dry wood and had a bit of moisture. The fire lasted all night, had full flame and a slight cool down from full burn at about 4am. It kept red hot coals until 5-6am. The stove pipe I used was a mix match of pipes a few drilled holes in the walls. About 4 am I heard water dripping out of a hole in the horizontal pipe. I put a bucket under it, At first I thought it was from show that was dripping down. But No it was coming out of the exhaust pipe. It would drip out a half of a gallon of black water each morning at the same time.
I hear all of the stories of 20 feet plus horizontal pipes before your vertical pipe. This is the first time I have used such a long horizontal pipe on any wood stove. Makes me wonder how some people say this only steam. Heck this was a half a gallon of water that would come out every morning at about 4 am of this pipe every day.
If anyone has any comments about my actual experience last week, Please make comments from your Actual experiences on moisture and not just information you read in a book sometime . I am guessing the pipes need to be insulated in this application. but thats a lot of water to end up in a bucket every day.It was the only pipe I had available to me. It has been disassembled and will never be used this way again up there.

It kept me nice and warm for the time I was there, Even with junk wood that I burned.

Just wanted to share this trip with wood burning stove guys.
 
A Bowen
Posts: 8
Location: Swanton OH
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Was / Is the 60" horizontal run really horizontal or did it have a slight angle to it?

 
Jeremiah wales
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it was really 60 degree Horizontal. there may have been a 1 degree difference at the joint where two pipes connected. That is where the water came out. At the seam. This actually happened. I expected more people to answer about the water that came out.
 
Alder Burns
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Location: northern California
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This doesn't surprise me, especially since the wood you were using wasn't absolutely dry. The horizontal pipe was doing a lot of work in helping to heat your space from the hot smoke going through it, and in the process the steam in the smoke condensed and dripped out. Most people who have a vertical stove pipe just never see this since the condensation runs back down into the stove and becomes steam again, until finally it goes out the top with the rest of the smoke.
A more important danger is creosote, which would accumulate likewise and might try to drip out at the same place....might be why the water was black. It would be a good thing to take the whole pipe apart and brush out each section before each heating season......
 
Jeremiah wales
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Now thats the answer of Experience....
Well
When is the last time anyone burned Absolutely Dry Wood. Does it exist in anyones wood pile?
So you are saying that Horizontal pipes are Danger to every stove that exists?
 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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While my wood has never been kiln dried, most of what I have burned are scraps from demolished buildings in the 60 to 120 year old range. I store wood inside the heated portion of the houses for at least a week before burning. It's bone dry.

Because it was extremely cold, some water may have frozen to the pipe outside, right near the end of the run. A hot fire in the morning would melt it and allow the water to flow back inside. Bubbles of creosote can sometimes contain water. Edit --- Your water came before morning heat. Moisture condensed outside, may have run in and mixed with a bubbly mess of creosote. It's possible that upon cooling, the materials separated with the water running down and the sticky stuff remaining in the pipe.
 
allen lumley
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Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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Jeremiah wales : Basically rocket mass heaters RMHs, are the only solid fuel burning Heating units that SHOULD never make creosote. Having said that,
if it is made by man to be used by man, someone can screw it up, Too deep a bed of ashes can limit the air allowed for primary combustion, and you are right
back to a smoldering fire, add damp wood and all combustion efficiency is reduced until the combined sources of Water vapor/steam have been vented !

If a stove pipe 'T' is properly installed and oriented to create a drip leg below the "T" then you can place a barrel below it to catch the combined runoff for use
or disposal later, Creosote that shows up in a horizontal pipe is not the problem it is a symptom! Only if the Presence of Creosote is ignored can it become a
problem, irregardless of location ! For the Good of the Craft ! Big AL !
 
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