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Can I use frozen seeds?

 
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I noticed that I never did do anything with those tomatoes that I harvested last fall. They have been in my freezer this whole time.

If I planted the frozen tomato might it grow into a tomato plant? Would it produce good tomatoes?

Thanks,
 
Posts: 236
Location: SE Wisconsin, USA zone 5b
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I am going to answer your questions with two big fat maybes.

Maybe the seeds will germinate, and if they do then maybe the tomatoes will be good.

I know that tomato seeds can be successfully stored in the freezer after they have been dried to 5% or less moisture content. As far as whole tomatoes I don't know. The seed coat may protect them from frost damage, that would be my guess since I have seen many volunteer plants sprout after our Winters here in Wisconsin. The only way to find out is to sprout them.

As far as producing good tomatoes, that gets a little more complicated. If the tomatoes you planted last year were open pollinated or heirloom (heirloom is open pollinated with a good story), and you only had one variety then yes, you should get the same tomatoes from the seed. If the tomatoes you planted last year were hybrids, or you had multiple varieties within 30' of each other, then the seeds will not be the same as the parents. That doesn't automatically mean they will be bad, it just means you won't know what to expect until the fruit is ready and there is no guarantee they will be something you want to eat.

Hope this helps, have a great season.
 
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
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thats how they store seeds, but they are supposed to be dried first.

might as well give it a shot, tomatoes are weeds after all....
 
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Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Even if they aren't good to eat, chickens, pigs and worms don't know that.

 
Eliminate 95% of the weeds in your lawn by mowing 3 inches or higher. Then plant tiny ads:
HARDY FRUIT TREES FOR ORGANIC AND PERMACULTURE
https://permies.com/t/132540/HARDY-FRUIT-TREES-ORGANIC-PERMACULTURE
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