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potatoes with fruit

 
Karl Teceno
Posts: 91
Location: Portland Maine
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I have grown tons (literally) of potatoes over the years. Awhile ago, I moved to the city. This year I planted potatoes for the first time. The plants are very healthy. I have pulled a few plants and they have some really nice potatoes. They also have what appears to be a fruit where the flowers were. They are about the size of a grape tomato and look kind of like a tomato. I have never seen this before.
Can I assume that the conditions were optimal for the plants to fruit? Anybody know?

Karl
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Posts: 8982
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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The fruits contain seeds and of course are toxic.  Potatoes rarely fruit, so yes you can assume your potatoes loved what you did for them! 

You could try growing new potato plants from the seed, but they will not necessarily resemble the parents.
 
Jami McBride
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Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
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Wow this is so great to know . . . .

I had these little green not-tomatoes this year and thought a wild tomato plant had gotten in with my potatoes 

Live and learn, thanks Karl and Ludi.
 
                                
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Years ago I used to till my neighbor's garden in spring. One year I noticed potato seedlings everywhere so I brought some home and grew them out. The year before, her potatoes were "Kennebec". They grew a little smaller potatoes than usual but to my surprise were all exactly alike, as far as I could tell and much like the original K's. I had always heard there'd be lots of variation.
 
Jordan Lowery
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Location: zone 7
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there called TPS or true seed potatoes. if you are the kind of person who loves seeds and new varieties you are in luck. growing out those seeds will give you a diversity of potatoes( if the pollen came from some gardens around you)  with good selection and a bit of luck you can grow your own potato variety's no one else on earth has. the first year they are best grown in pots because the potatoes dont grow as big, and it helps you identify potential plants to grow in the main garden as most will be different. if you do some googling for true seed potato you will get a lot of info on them, how to grow them, and why.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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they are quite common on healthy potatoes. You can plant them for potatoes, or leave them on the plant to "go to seed" as they likely aren't completely ripe..they kinda go soft when they ripen like tomatoes do.

but you can also save the seed similar to tomato and then replant them in the spring.
 
Karl Teceno
Posts: 91
Location: Portland Maine
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Thaks for the info everyone! I had figured they would be toxic and I figured they a seed but needed some reassurance.

Thanks again!
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
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Good to know!

I have some of these, too. I guess I'll start trying to breed a variety adapted to my local climate, this year!
 
Kay Bee
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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When i first saw this thread title, i thought it would be about graft potato plants 

I've read about how you can graft tomato on to potato plants as a "rootstock" but have never tried it.  a hot pepper interstem would be even more fun.

Unless you have a greenhouse to keep the plant alive for more than a season, I can't imagine it would be worth the effort beyond the novelty.  I wonder how the vigorous topgrowth of tomatoes and some pepper varieties would affect the potato yield?  Would the plants still die back once the potatoes had formed?
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
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Location: Oakland, CA
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SouthEastFarmer wrote:
When i first saw this thread title, i thought it would be about graft potato plants 

I've read about how you can graft tomato on to potato plants as a "rootstock" but have never tried it.  a hot pepper interstem would be even more fun.

Unless you have a greenhouse to keep the plant alive for more than a season, I can't imagine it would be worth the effort beyond the novelty.  I wonder how the vigorous topgrowth of tomatoes and some pepper varieties would affect the potato yield?  Would the plants still die back once the potatoes had formed?


I asked my dad about that years ago. He says it does cut into the yield of both spuds and fruit.

Does the capsaicin come from the interstem? If it's generated in the roots, the way nicotine is, then a hot tomato might become a marketable item...hm.

Peppers are perennial in my conditions, given enough masonry & mulch.
 
                                
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Sorry, capsaicin is only made in the membrane that surrounds the seeds of peppers, not the stem. Good idea tho, spicy tomatoes would be cool. Eventually there'll be GMO ones, yuk!
 
Kay Bee
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
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too bad on the capsaicin - that would be a very worthwhile novelty. 

A cherry tomato top with a rootstock for new potatoes would be interesting.
 
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