• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

are my tomato plants dead?

 
Joshua Hipple
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I left my tomato plants outside last night and we got a frost, (although last time i checked the weather we werent supposed to). I left them out and this morning they were all wilted over, they were sitting on my porch all night. are they most likely all dead? Or do i have a chance?

thanks
HERE IS A PIC....
they seemed to have perked up a bit after being in the sun for a few hours
TOMATO.jpg
[Thumbnail for TOMATO.jpg]
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3782
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
145
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They don't look to bad. Give them a little more time and see if they keep growing.
Have you planted tomatoes before? Need any more help with them?
 
Joshua Hipple
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Miles Flansburg wrote:They don't look to bad. Give them a little more time and see if they keep growing.
Have you planted tomatoes before? Need any more help with them?


this is my first year with really going all out on gardening. i have attempted in the past. but failed. so any tips are certainly welcome
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5618
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
285
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If they are perking back up you are OK...unless it froze the growing tip maybe. Really dead is when they turn dark green and don't revive. We are having a lot of drops into the thirties at night here and it is very odd for April. I would ordinarily have tomatoes in the ground by now but I am moving them back and forth into the house at night.
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
Posts: 3782
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
145
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
OK, I just wanted to suggest that when you transplant them you plant them deep. I usually bury the stem and leave the top few leaves out of the ground. The stem will grow roots and help get the plant going.
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!