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Planting around pests

 
Aaron Festa
Posts: 149
Location: Connecticut
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Are there any reference material, books, or general rules of thumb for planting vegetables around common insects? For example last year I planted boc choi in early spring only to be decimated by the white butterfly. I learned they mate in early spring. Well the larvae ate all the leaves and went no. 2 on what was left. Little buggers. This year I did the same. I dont take good notes. I'm thinking it would be better to plant any member of the cabbage family after mating season-late summer/fall. Maybe this is already common knowledge to experienced growers but I'm still learning. I know the growing season and insects go hand in hand and they are they unavoidable. But I thought it was atleast something to explore. And chickens are not an option for me-yet. So is there a better time in the season to grow certain vegetables to avoid pests? I appreciate any feedback.
 
Bob Dobbs
Posts: 145
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I'd look into catch-crops for the cabbage loopers, or perhaps a badminton racket haha. Old timers used to plant collards at the edges of cabbage rows because they prefer collards and thus leave the cabbage alone. An alternative would be bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, otherwise known as BT or dipel. 100% organic and it doesn't affect anything other than other caterpillar types.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Aaron, We have given up on any spring cole crops. I try to plant early september and hope for rain in order to grow them big enough to go into the winter. Collards and kale can take some freezing. Other greens, like mustard and turnips seem to do better into fall also.
We had been told to plant some things late...like squash, to avoid squash bugs, but by then the heat interferes with growth and pollination.I don't use BT. I really believe that the 'good bug' will show up eventually and balance things out. We have seen some of the tiny preditor wasp eggs on tomato worms.
 
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