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Creating an Edible or Medicinal Garden for Your Use and for Butterflies to Enjoy  RSS feed

 
Anne Miller
pollinator
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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"Pollinators are responsible for assisting over 80% of the world's flowering plants. Without them, humans and wildlife wouldn't have much to eat or look at! Animals that assist plants in their reproduction as pollinators include species of ants, bats, bees, beetles, birds, butterflies, flies, moths, wasps, as well as other unusual animals. Wind and water also play a role in the pollination of many plants."

Butterflies, like the honeybee, are excellent pollinators and will help increase your flower, fruit and vegetable production. The secret to successful butterfly gardens lies in providing a wide variety of flowers and shrubs.

One of the joys of having a garden is seeing the butterflies take wing among the flowers.  Simple flowers are better than fancy double-hybrids, offering an easy-to-reach nectar source.   Aim for a wide spectrum of flower colors. Some butterflies prefer oranges, reds and yellows, while others like whites, purples and blues.   "It's very true that if you plant it, they will come."

The truth is, butterflies don't care how you approach herb gardening, so long as you set out their favorite nectar and larval plants. And as I've discovered on my tiny parcel of land, a bit of creative mixing can be attractive and enjoyable. You'll be happier with an herb garden that has been thoughtfully planned. Consider, along with your own personal style and plant preferences, a pleasing combination of plant sizes, colors, textures, and seasons of bloom.

From the University of Texas article on Butterfly Gardening:      “A damp sand patch, baited with a small amount of manure, fermenting fruit such as bananas or cantaloupe, or ripe fish will attract butterflies in a puddle assemblage where they will be less wary. These assemblages make observation and photography easy.”

Make a Mud Puddle: The damp edges around garden ponds are perfect areas for butterfly puddling, but you can also make your own butterfly puddle by filling a small bowl with sand and moistening with water. Find a nice spot in your garden and dig the bowl into the ground.  Add a small pinch of salt to entice the males; you may find that many males of a single species come to visit with their friends. Decorate the butterfly puddle with river rocks or clam shells to give the butterflies a nice place to bask in the sun.

A butterfly-pleasing oregano for hedges is Origanum vulgare 'Aureum,' with its golden leaves and pink flowers.

You could build your entire herb garden around sage because there are hundreds of varieties, from annuals to biennials to tender or hardy perennials. Salvia coccinea, with its tubular red flowers, will appeal more to hummingbirds, but other red varieties will bring in butterflies: cherry sage (Salvia greggi), pineapple sage (S. rutilans), honeydew melon sage (S. elegans), and the annual variety, scarlet sage (S. splendens). Tall, blue-flowered sages for butterflies include Mexican bush sage (S. leucantha), blue sage (S. Clevelandii), bog sage (S. uliginosa), and anise-scented sage (S. guaranitica).

Pick carefully  Be careful not to carry small larvae into your kitchen when trimming off a bit of herb for your culinary creations.
Butterfly eggs are tiny, Monarch butterfly eggs are the size of a pin head, but they are often laid in bunches.

Please do your own research as to how these are edible or medicinal

Edible or Medicinal Flowers and Herbs
Coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea)
Passion Flowers (Passiflora spp.)
Spotted Joe Pye Weed (Eutrochium maculatum)
Lavender  (L. angustifolia)
lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)
bee balm (Mondara didyma)
wild bergamot (M. fistulosa)
lemon mint (M. citriodora)
plains beebalm (M. pectinata)
Oswego tea (M. didyma)
nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus)
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Herbs:
Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)
Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum)
Dill (Antheum graveolens)
Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)
mountain mint (Pycnanthemum spp.)
dotted mint (Monarda punctata)
Parsley (Petroselinum crispum)
purple oreganos, Origanum laevigatum 'Hopley's' and 'Herrenhausen,'
Thyme (Thymus spp.)
Creeping thyme (Thymus pseudolanguinosus)
wild marjoram (Origanum vulgare)
true valerian (Valeriana officinalis)



Some shrubs that butterflies like:   unknown if they are edible or medicinal
Coontie (Zamia pumila)
False Indigo (Baptisia australis)
Spicebush (Lindera benzoin )


Good Article on Herbs for Butterflies
 
Casie Becker
garden master
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Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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I'll add a side note for people just starting. It took three years before large numbers butterflies found my lantanas and a couple of years for the milkweed. I think if the milkweed hadn't been right next to the lantana it may have been three years, also. Don't give up if you don't have immediate results. Until this year I had come to the conclusion that were overrated as butterfly plants. This year we had clouds surrounding them ever time I went past.

That's not to say you won't have fast results. Small butterflies immediately found my culinary herbs and the numbers have increased every year I let the frog fruit proliferate.
 
Anne Miller
pollinator
Posts: 664
Location: USDA Zone 8a
40
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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Here are some butterflies you might attract:

pipevine-butterfly.jpg
[Thumbnail for pipevine-butterfly.jpg]
Pipevine Butterfly
Monarch-on-Mexican-Sunflower.jpg
[Thumbnail for Monarch-on-Mexican-Sunflower.jpg]
Monarch on Mexican Sunflower
Lavandula-pinnata-plant.gif
[Thumbnail for Lavandula-pinnata-plant.gif]
And a Lavender Plant
 
Anne Miller
pollinator
Posts: 664
Location: USDA Zone 8a
40
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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Purple coneflower is so easy to grow and attractive and draws so many birds and butterflies that you simply must grow coneflowers, if you have the room. Valued for its large sturdy daisylike flowers with dropping petals, this prairie native will spread easily in good soil and full sun. It is bothered by few pests or diseases. It's a great cut flower -- bring in armloads of it to brighten the house. And birds and butterflies love coneflower plants. Allow it to spread so that you have at least a small stand of it. Let the flowers go to seed and the goldfinches will love you, coming to feast on the coneflower seeds daily. Butterflies and helpful bees also love purple coneflower.

It used to be that rosy purple or white were the only choices in flower color. Recent hybrids have introduced yellow, orange, burgundy, cream, and shades in between.

I want to stay with natives as much as possible but I fell in love with "Hot Papaya coneflower"; it is out of my price range.

Echinacea - From Wikipedia

Some species of echinacea, notably E. purpurea, E. angustifolia, and E. pallida, are grown as ornamental plants in gardens. Many cultivars exist, and many of them are asexually propagated to keep them true to type.

They tolerate a wide variety of conditions, maintain attractive foliage throughout the season, and multiply rapidly. Appropriate species are used in prairie restorations. Echinacea plants also reseed in the fall. New flowers will grow where seeds have fallen from the prior year.

These flowering plants and their parts have different uses. Some species are cultivated in gardens for their showy flowers. Echinacea purpurea is used in folk medicine.

Some Species:

    Echinacea angustifolia – Narrow-leaf coneflower
    Echinacea atrorubens – Topeka purple coneflower
    Echinacea laevigata – Smooth coneflower, smooth purple coneflower
    Echinacea pallida – Pale purple coneflower
    Echinacea paradoxa – Yellow coneflower, Bush's purple coneflower
    Echinacea purpurea – Purple coneflower, eastern purple coneflower
    Echinacea sanguinea – Sanguine purple coneflower
    Echinacea serotina – Narrow-leaved purple coneflower
    Echinacea simulata – Wavyleaf purple coneflower
    Echinacea tennesseensis – Tennessee coneflower

Echinacea angustifolia was widely used by the North American Plains Indians for its supposed medicinal qualities.... some Plains tribes did use echinacea for cold symptoms. The Kiowa used it for coughs and sore throats, the Cheyenne for sore throats, the Pawnee for headaches, and many tribes including the Lakotah used it as a pain medication.

 
Anne Miller
pollinator
Posts: 664
Location: USDA Zone 8a
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I found this list of edible flowers.

Caution: Other parts than the flowers of the plants mentioned in this list may be poisonous.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_edible_flowers
 
Anne Miller
pollinator
Posts: 664
Location: USDA Zone 8a
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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dedicated thread about just plain ol' eatin' herbs. (though some of them are still indeed medicinal) so here's me starting one with this nifty infographic.


https://permies.com/t/52705/cooking-flavoring-fresh-herbs#545164

These cooking herbs can be planted along with the ones the butterflies like.  Some of them may also help to repel pests like bugs, deer and rabbits.

What I like best about the Chart is because of the Key Flavor Profile and the cooking tip!  Great info!  It also tells how to store fresh herbs that you purchase at the store.
 
Anne Miller
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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Botanically, herb is short for herbaceous, meaning a plant that grows from a soft—not woody—stem. Historically, however, the word herb refers to plants that are useful to people by way of their flavor, fragrance, or medicinal properties, no matter what type of stem they grow from.

When you think of an herb garden you may picture a summertime patch of colorful plants, but not all herbs exist just for summer harvest. Some of the most common herbs grown in the United States are evergreen . Growing evergreen herbs requires a little more care than raising annual varieties, but the rewards are worth the effort. Watch the weather and give these plants some protection during the worst of winter weather by piling leaf mold around the base and covering the plants with fleece or other warm fabrics.



Silver thyme Thymus vulgaris ‘Argenteus’ is a wonderful herb to grow in cracks and crevices. This evergreen grows up to 12 inches tall and has small lavender-pink blossoms in summer. Its fragrant, silver-edged leaves create a bushy and abundant texture that can be used to soften hard edges or to dapple a pathway. Zones: 4 to 9 Thyme needs a mention in a list of deer resistant and drought tolerant herbs.

Ornamental oregano Origanum laevigatum An excellent herb that grows well in stone walls, this 24-inch-tall creeping perennial is native to Turkey and Cypress, where it can be found growing in rocky terrain. Its dark-green leaves have a rich purple tint, and its purplish-pink flower clusters appear from late spring through autumn. Zones: 7 to 10 Deer resistant

Roman chamomile Chamaemelum nobile A hardy perennial, Roman chamomile thrives in moist, rich soil and grows to 12 inches tall. Its young leaves and flowers can be gathered to make a calming tea. Its threadlike leaves fill the air with a pleasing apple-pineapple scent. This delightful herb reveals its white, daisylike blooms in summer. Although it spreads like a ground cover, it tends to be patchy. Zones: 6 to 9

‘Berggarten’ sage Salvia officinalis ‘Berggarten’ One of the most beautiful foliage herbs, originally from Germany, is ‘Berggarten’ sage, which has a shapely, compact habit and large rounded leaves. At 2 feet tall, it’s perfect for planting at the corners of beds and along walkways. Zones: 5 to 8 Deer resistant

Catmint Nepeta X faassenii With its smallish gray-green leaves, arching habit, and lavender-blue flowers in summer, it can soften and adorn the edges of beds. In particular, its 18-inch-tall form blends well. This catmint has few medicinal or culinary attributes, but it does make a lovely cut flower. It is often irresistible to cats, so you may find a euphoric feline friend lying in the center of your plants from time to time. Zones: 4 to 8 Deer resistant

‘Salem’ rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Salem’ Evergreen ‘Salem’ rosemary is another excellent foliage plant. Its shiny, green, needlelike leaves weave through beds like a thread in a tapestry, and it bears small blue flowers in early spring. This herb makes an excellent hedging plant or accent at the edge of borders or in containers. ‘Salem’ reaches up to 2 feet tall, but it takes well to pruning throughout the growing season. Zones: 7 to 10 What makes rosemary so wonderful, its unique smell, also makes it unpalatable to deer and other wildlife. Being a Mediterranean herb, Rosemary is a no-brainer as the perfect herb for a drought garden.

Cardoon Cynara cardunculus Its gray-green arching leaves and statuesque frame give rise to its round, purple, thistlelike flowers in midsummer. In its glory, cardoon reaches 5 feet tall and 4 feet wide and is perfect in a mixed border. The magnificent flower heads can be cut and dried for floral arrangements. As an edible plant, its leaf stalks and midribs are tasty when blanched, while the unopened flower heads can be boiled and eaten, like those of its close cousin the artichoke. Zones: 7 to 9

‘Tutti Frutti’ anise hyssop Agastache ‘Tutti Frutti’ Another herb that attracts a great deal of attention in the border is ‘Tutti Frutti’ anise hyssop. Its stunning raspberry-red flower spikes reach up to a foot long and offer appealing color in late summer. Plants stand 2 to 6 feet tall with gray-green toothed leaves. Zones: 6 to 10 deer resistant

Garlic chives Allium tuberosum It’s hard to miss this plant in late summer when its lovely starry-white flowers are in full bloom. After it flowers, cut the attractive seed heads back to prevent vigorous seedlings from sprouting up everywhere. The seed heads are great for decorative use indoors, while the flat, garlic-flavored leaves can be harvested throughout the growing season to add to soups, sauces, and dips. Zones: 4 to 8 Deer resistant
 
Anne Miller
pollinator
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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This topic has a list of medicinal herbs that would be worthy of any herb garden.  I have not gone the the link provided so I am only posting this for the list.  I plan to research the ones that are not familiar to me.

https://permies.com/t/11669/kitchen/Medicinal-plants-herbs-healing-diseases

Vinko Cev wrote:MEDICINAL PLANTS AND HERBS FOR HEALING DISEASES.


We prepared short list of diseases which can be cured by using various medicinal plants. They can at least alleviate the problems we have because of illness. The advantages of use are in prevention and medicinal intentions. Above all, we can provide a lot of herbs and medicinal plants by ourselves in meadows, fields, forests , well in nature.
We believe that ECHINACEA (Echinacea purpurea), ANGELICA (Angelica archangelica), ARNICA (Arnica montana), BASIL (Ocimum basilicum), ELDER BUSH (Sambucus nigra), WHORTLEBERRY (Vaccinium myrtillus), WILD STRAWBERRIES (Fragaria vesca), CHAMOMILE (Matricaria chamomilla), NETTLE (Urtica dioica), CORN SILK (Stigmata maydis), QUINCE (Cydónia oblónga Mill), COLTSFOOT (Tussilago farfara), WILD PANSY (Viola Tricolor herba), Marjoram (Origanum majarona), THYME (Thymus vulgaris), MELISE (Melissa officinalis), HOREHOUND (Marrubium Vulgare), HOUSELEEK (Sempervivum tectorum), MARIGOLD (Calendula officinalis), MISTLETOE (Viscum album), ABSINTH (Artemisia absinthium), LUNGWORT (Pulmonaria officinalis), RHUBARB (Rheum officinale), DANDELION (Taraxacum officinale), ROSEMARY (Rosmarinus Officinalis), LAVENDER (Lavandula angustifolia), SPRUCE TIPS (Picea excelsa), ST JOHN'S WORT (Hypericum perforatum), PLANTAIN (Plantago lanceolata), VIOLET (Viola odorata), SAGE (Salvia officinalis), and of course other herbs should not be missing in any domestic pharmacy.

For now, we prepared for you this collection of medical plants, that should not miss in home apothecary. We will supplement web page soon and add more plants, that will help you with easing and treatment of your diseases and troubles.


This link has a list of safe herbs and benefits for your Canine Friend

http://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/safe-herbs-for-dogs.html

Canine Dental Care

http://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/canine-dental-care.html

Fortunately, a number of herbs can be used to speed up the healing process and to prevent recurrence:

    Oregon grape: Use a tincture of Oregon grape to inhibit bacterial growth. Use a cotton swab to liberally apply the tincture directly to your dog's gums. Oregon grape is antiseptic and also promotes new gum tissue growth. Other herbs with similar properties include Goldenseal, and Myrrh.
    Echinacea: If the teeth are infected and your dog is weak and thin as a result of his dental problem, try apply a tincture of echinacea directly to your dog's gums directly with a cotton swab.
    Calendula: If your dog has bleeding gums, apply a tincture of calendula directly to the gums. Calendula is excellent for healing wounds and stopping bleeding.

Some herbs are well known for their abilities to promote dental health and fresh breath. For example:

    Fennel - Fennel is rich in vitamin C, has anti-inflammatory properties, and can help fight gingivitis and freshen your dog's breath.
    Parsley - Parsley also has potent antimicrobial properties and is commonly used as a breath freshener.
    Dill - Dill has potent antimicrobial properties that helps fight infections.

The good news is, all these culinary herbs can easily be fed to your dog. Just sprinkle some of these herbs on his food every day!



 
Anne Miller
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I have a tooth that has been bothering me for 2 or 3 years.  Every time it starts to hurt DH says he has a tooth with a cavity that needs to come out.  I have said nothing about my tooth.  Now he says he has another tooth bothering him and my tooth is bothering me too.

On Thursday, I found out the I need eye surgery.  I can't afford to have tooth problems now.  My tooth does not hurt but it is sensitive to touch.

We have lots of plantain so while walking the dog, I picked a leaf, took it in and washed it, then bit into it some and put it on my tooth, it felt better.

So I have been reading WAPF, Dr Mercola, and Wellnessmama.

Here is my strategy to improve the tooth and my health for surgery:

Lots of bone broth; mouth wash of baking soda and oregano; use honey and apple cider vinegar as a mouth wash; brushing teeth with baking soda and hydrogen peroxide; adding turmeric and ginger to my tea; adding parsley to bone broth, soup, stew and other foods that complement it and use more plantain because I have lots.  I may see if the nettles are still around.

I purchased a parsley plant to add to my garden, but it is an annual so I will plant it in a pot so I can bring it in for the winter.

Here is what I learned about parsley and a recipe:

Flat Leaf Parsley
It’s an annual herb thought to have originated in southeastern Europe or western Asia, now grown in gardens throughout the world.

There are two basic parsley types: one with curly, crinkly leaves and the more familiar Italian parsley, which is flat. The latter is hardier for withstanding cold in Northern or Midwest gardens. Parsley usually reaches one to two feet in height in the first year before flowering, and grows best in partial shade. It's been suggested that because it's a bit difficult to start from seed, taking up to two months to sprout, buying small parsley seedlings may be a better way to start this in your indoor pots or late spring garden. One tip involves pouring a kettle of boiling water along the row before covering the seeds. As a potted plant, keep it evenly moist. Don't think of it as decorative on your plate; this medicinal herb is loaded with nutrients as well as healing powers to help with flatulence and bad breath.

If you want to be impressed by parsley, take a look at its vitamin K content – a whopping 574% of the daily recommended value. What this does is promote bone strength, but it also has a role in the treatment and possible prevention of Alzheimer's disease by limiting neuronal damage in the brain. The vitamin K dominance is enough to make the 62% daily value of vitamin C and the 47% DV in vitamin A look positively paltry, but the “C” content is 3 times more than in oranges, and the “A” augments the carotenes lutein and zeaxanthin, helping to prevent eye diseases like cataracts and macular degeneration.
The iron in parsley (twice as much as in spinach) is essential for the production of an important oxygen-carrying component in the red blood cells called heme. Copper is important because it’s required by the body for normal metabolic processes, but must be supplied through outside sources. The manganese in parsley contains super-antioxidant superoxide dismutase, and the folate helps form red blood cells and make up our genetic material.

Parsley is useful as a digestive aid with its high fiber content. This helps move foods through the digestive tract and controls blood-cholesterol levels, but has a diuretic effect as well. A tea made from parsley is a traditional remedy for colic, indigestion, and intestinal gas. As an herb sprinkled in food, it actually helps purify the blood and fight cancer. Eating parsley is now thought to be a way to detoxify the system of harmful compounds like mercury, sometimes found in dental fillings.

Quite a unique compilation of compounds and volatile oils is contained in parsley. Eugenol is used in dentistry as a local anesthetic and an antiseptic to help prevent gum diseases. It's also been found to reduce blood sugar levels. Polyphenolic flavonoids and antioxidants include apiin, apigenin, crisoeriol, and alphathujen. Volatile oils include myristicin, limonene, apiol, and alpha-thujene. It also contains one of the highest antioxidant counts among plants, with an oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of 74,349 per 100 grams of fresh, raw parsley.

Chopped fresh or dried and combined with thyme and bay leaves, parsley is included in the French combination of herbs called bouquet garni, used to season stock, stews, and soups. It can be added to sandwiches, any type of casserole and adds a fresh, spring-like flavor to dips and cheese. The best way to keep fresh parsley sprigs is to wrap them in damp paper towels, place in a sealed zip-lock baggie, and keep refrigerated. Dried parsley flakes are useful for several months when stored in a tightly sealed glass container and stored in cool, dark, and dry place.

Parsley Jelly
"This is an old English recipe that is especially good on meats. Instead of parsley you may substitute mint, rosemary, sage, tarragon, or thyme. If you can only find dried parsley, use 1/4 cup."

    2 1/2 cups boiling water
    10 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
    1/4 cup cider vinegar
    2 1/2 cups honey
    1/2 (6 fluid ounce) container liquid pectin

    Make a strong infusion by pouring the boiling water over the parsley. Let stand for 15 minutes. Strain out bits of parsley, and reserve liquid in a glass or stainless steel saucepan.
    Stir the honey and vinegar into the parsley water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the pectin, and continue to boil, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Remove from heat, and skim off any foam from the top. Transfer to sterile jars, and seal in a hot water bath.
 
Anne Miller
pollinator
Posts: 664
Location: USDA Zone 8a
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4/14/17  Since herbs play a big part, in my humble opinion, to getting healthy ... I am making this thread my getting healthy project.

The tooth is not bothering me anymore except some after the evening meal, mostly due to chewing.  I have mostly been using baking soda to brush my teeth.  I am eating bone broth which after heating I add two or three stalks of parley and chives.

I have done oil pulling or oil swishing previously so I am going to add that to my regime.  I am not sure what the correct term is .. I am making an oil infusion using the lemon balm to use with the oil pulling.

Here is some of the information I have learned about Lemon Balm and a recipe:

Lemon Balm  (Melissa officinalis) 
A relative of mint, lemon balm is a versatile medicinal herb that helps relieve anxiety, insomnia, wounds, herpes, insect bites, flatulence, and an upset stomach. It also speeds the healing of cold sores.

A lovely mild herb named for the lemony scent of its leaves. Originally grown in South Europe, lemon balm is often used in combination with other herbs and is frequently found in poultry and fish dishes, desserts, and teas. It also makes a nicely scented sachet.

Lemon balm is perennial in zones 4 to 9. Plants are not frost-tolerant. If you need plants to survive a light frost, cover them with a frost blanket.
The plant looks best when it is cut back periodically, so plan to use lots of fresh, flavorful leaves to brew tea, flavor fruit or green salad, and season fish. Be sure to include stems in bouquets of summer flowers.
Common issues: Lemon balm can spread rapidly in the garden. Help prevent self-sowing by clipping stems back to a few inches several times during the growing season, so the plants don’t set seeds. Clip as soon as flowers appear. Lemon balm is generally pest-free.
Lemon balm does not spread by underground runners like mint. It will increase in size, though, making a bigger clump in the garden each season and sprouting from seeds that develop from inconspicuous flowers. To keep it from taking up too much of your garden, cut the plant back to a few inches tall several times during the growing season. This will keep the plant bushy and healthy-looking while preventing seeds from ripening. The flowers of lemon balm are not necessarily showy, but they will produce viable seeds that will germinate in your garden.

Harvesting: Pick lemon balm leaves at any point in the growing season. Leaves tend to become smaller after plants flower. Clip leafy stems to be as long as you want. Plants branch freely from just below where you snip stems, so place cuts accordingly.

It is a multi use Herb: use it in recipes that require lemon peel, as a good substitute for lemon peel. it tasted just as good if not better. Great for teas and many other things
Like many other herbs, lemon balm can lose its flavor in cooking, so add it near the end of the cooking process. The fresh lemon fragrance and flavor go nicely with both chicken and fish dishes, as well as fruit and fruit juice drinks. Create your own herbal tea by cutting a few stems of lemon balm (plus any other appealing herbs), putting them in a pitcher, pour boiling water over them, and allow them to steep for about 15 minutes. Enjoy your tea hot or over ice.

Lemon Balm Tea Sorbet
    1 cup white sugar
        1/2 cup water
    6 lemon balm leaves
    2 cups brewed orange pekoe tea

    Combine sugar, water, and mint leaves in a small pot over medium heat; cook until sugar dissolves and mixture is thick and syrupy. Remove from heat. Strain out mint leaves and discard. Cool syrup to room temperature, about 20 minutes.
    Combine brewed tea with lemon juice in a bowl with a lid. Stir in syrup. Refrigerate until temperature reaches 40 degrees F (4 degrees C), about 20 minutes.
    Pour tea mixture into an ice cream maker and freeze according to manufacturer's instructions for sorbet, 10 to 15 minutes.

Storage: Fresh lemon balm stems keep in water at room temperature five to seven days. For longer storage, dry or freeze leaves. Individually quick freeze leaves on a parchment-lined tray and store in freezer bags, or freeze in ice cubes.

This plant is also wonderful as a repellant for mosquitoes. Keep it on your deck or patio to keep them at bay. You can also crush up some leaves and rub them on your exposed skin to stop them from biting you, and it smells pleasant too.

    Type: Perennial, zones 5 to 9
    Planting time: Spring, after the last frost
    Features: Lemon-scented leaves
    Light: Part shade
    Soil: Well drained, let dry between waterings; pH 6.7 to 7.3
    Spacing: 20 to 24 inches
    Plant size: 24 to 36 inches tall
 
K Putnam
pollinator
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Location: Unincorporated Pierce County, WA Zone 7b
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This is a wonderful thread.  With the vagaries of trying to grow fruit trees here in the PNW, my attention has been shifting away from trees and towards a medicinal pollinator garden.

Here is a list of Puget Sound butterflies and their food plants.  It probably looks a bit different than drier regions. 

https://wabutterflyassoc.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Common-Butterflies-of-Puget-Sound-2.pdf


 
Anne Miller
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4/20/17 Update:  my tooth is not bothering me anymore.

We went to water the sunflowers yesterday and the are already up after the rain we got a few days ago.

Now regarding getting healthy:  I have never smoked and I gave up sodas about 15 years ago or more.  In an effort to do this I have given up drinking sweet green tea and fruit juices.  I am now drinking water and tonic water for leg cramps, occasionally having some ginger ale.

I started taking a multivitamin and glucosamine with chondroitin.  The glucosamine is to help with the long trips I will be making to have the surgery.  I also have limited being on the computer.

I eat fairly healthy except for junk foods what I do in moderation and will not buy when they are gone.  Except we will still have potato chips and tortilla chips for DH.

I would like to loose 15 lbs.
 
Anne Miller
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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I ran across this older thread today and thought I would share since it has some good info on medicinals:

https://permies.com/t/21919/kitchen/starting-medicinal-garden
 
Anne Miller
pollinator
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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Here is a list of herbs which can be used as Antibiotic Alternatives:

Garlic, goldenseal, licorice root, Echinacea, aloe vera, Capsaicin (cayenne pepper), Turmeric, Ginger, Oregano, Cinnamon, Honey, Apple Cider Vinegar,  Coconut oil (and coconut milk), Tea Tree Oil, + Grapefruit Seed Extract. 
 
Anne Miller
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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Until now, I have never had depression or anxiety.  Now I am finding that I am bothered by Anxiety.  I try to go to sleep and after a period of time, I start to feel anxious.  Now I am feeling it more and more during the day.

Here is what I found that might help: Valerian, lavender and lemon balm.

I am going to try the valerian at bedtime. 

Valerian. In some studies, people who used valerian reported less anxiety and stress. In other studies, people reported no benefit. Valerian is generally considered safe at recommended doses, but since long-term safety trials are lacking, don't take it for more than a few weeks at a time. It can cause some side effects such as headaches and drowsiness.

Lavender. Some evidence suggests that oral lavender or aromatherapy with lavender can reduce anxiety; however, evidence is preliminary and limited. Oral lavender can cause constipation and headache. It also can increase appetite and the sedative effect of other medications and supplements and can cause low blood pressure.

Lemon balm. Preliminary research shows lemon balm can reduce some symptoms of anxiety, such as nervousness and excitability. Lemon balm is generally well-tolerated and considered safe for short-term use, but can cause nausea and abdominal pain.

Is there an effective herbal treatment for anxiety?

 
Stacy Witscher
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Location: SF Bay Area
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There isn't an effective Big Pharma treatment for anxiety, unless you want to go the narcotic route with it's diminishing returns.

In my experience, the best overall treatment for depression and anxiety is leaving the rat race. For specific anxiety producing issues, it's helpful to identify and try different techniques. For general monkey mind, I find distraction works best, like crocheting or coloring. Sleep problems, create a calming routine, herbal tea, quiet time etc.

Good luck
 
Anne Miller
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Location: USDA Zone 8a
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bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
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Stacy Witscher wrote:In my experience, the best overall treatment for depression and anxiety is leaving the rat race. For specific anxiety producing issues, it's helpful to identify and try different techniques. For general monkey mind, I find distraction works best, like crocheting or coloring. Sleep problems, create a calming routine, herbal tea, quiet time etc.

Good luck


I have been trying to pinpoint the issue ... I think it has to do with trying to go to sleep before my body/mind wants to or at the wrong time.  Then yesterday it started around dinnertime.  I tried walking around the garden, visualizing waterfalls and oceans, etc.
 
Anne Miller
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I have been drying and storing my herbs for winter use.  Now I would like to learn other ways to use them.  Such as how to make a infusion, tincture, salves, oils etc.

Here are some threads I have found helpful.

https://permies.com/t/58401/kitchen/Store-Plants-Medicinal

https://permies.com/t/9249/kitchen/tinctures-salve

https://permies.com/t/53268/kitchen/Herbal-Tincture-Newbie

https://permies.com/t/45762/kitchen/opinion-making-infusions

https://permies.com/t/37801/medicinal-plants#297595

https://permies.com/t/654/kitchen/making-tinctures

Lavender:
https://permies.com/t/9163/kitchen/Lavender-garden

Yarrow:
https://permies.com/t/8453/kitchen/Yarrow

 
I think I'll just lie down here for a second. And ponder this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - boots-to-roots
https://permies.com/t/59706/permaculture-bootcamp-boots-roots
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