• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • paul wheaton
  • Devaka Cooray
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Miles Flansburg
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mark Tudor
  • Pearl Sutton

cooking and flavoring with fresh herbs  RSS feed

 
steward
Posts: 3987
Location: Montana
331
bee books food preservation fungi
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i've seen a lot of stuff on permies about medicinal herbs, but not a dedicated thread about just plain ol' eatin' herbs. (though some of them are still indeed medicinal)

so here's me starting one with this nifty infographic.

 
gardener
Posts: 1825
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
218
forest garden urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's not how they say to store it, but I like to keep some dill in a ziploc in the freezer. When you pull it out the individual leaves just fall off without having to chop.

Additionally, I've found thyme (Lemon and English varieties) easiest to work with when dry. The leaves/needles easily separate from the woody stems at that point and they can be used whole or ground.
 
Posts: 44
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ohh thanks for this, great graphic!
 
steward
Posts: 2004
Location: Cortes Island, British Columbia. Zone: 8ish Lat: 50; Rainfall: 50" ish; sand and rocks; well water
492
bee books chicken forest garden fungi hugelkultur trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am so grateful to now live in a place where so many herbs are perennials - the rosemary, sage, thyme, and oregano are all growing fast and furious now that spring has finally decided to arrive. And the chives are coming up!

My favorite herb for most things is thyme. I love the smell, and the earthy flavor it adds to a dish - I love it in pea soup. It makes a great herbal vinegar, too. My second favorite cooking herb is summer savory. It's great on roast potatoes and in bean dishes. Yum!
 
pollinator
Posts: 1362
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
17
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Why should you put herbs in the fridge instead of picking them fresh? They lose flavour! For thyme I love lemon thyme but it is a bit less winter hardy. And I discovered sisho.
 
garden master
Posts: 2058
Location: USDA Zone 8a
405
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting cooking purity trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One reason is many of us don't have all those herbs in their gardens so we can't just go out and pick them.  

Last year I picked 3 herbs and three flowers for my Monarch Butterfly Garden.  Loveage, Lemon Balm and Yarrow.  I only got yarrow.  I later tried Lavender and soapwort with no luck.  This year I bought lavender. I am trying the lemon balm from seed without luck again [the seed was Burpees from the big box store].  I wanted creeping thyme but the seller said it was hard to grow and I haven't found a plant to buy.

I really like the chart because of the Key Flavor Profile and the cooking tip!
 
Casie Becker
gardener
Posts: 1825
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
218
forest garden urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Something new I've learned for myself over the past year is that my spice mill (alright, a coffee grinder I bought for this purpose) can handle fresh herbs like thyme and savory, even grinding the smaller stems. With the wetter herbs, if I combine a drier ingredient, I can grind them together. Before I thought they needed to be dried before grinding.

 
Anne Miller
garden master
Posts: 2058
Location: USDA Zone 8a
405
bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting cooking purity trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
With cooler weather and the thought of winter coming I have been cutting and drying my herbs.  I also put a few in the freezer.

I have really enjoyed my fresh herbs right out of my garden but I also want to have them to use this winter.
 
Make yourself as serene as a flower, as a tree. And on wednesdays, as serene as this tiny ad:
One million tiny ads for $25
https://permies.com/t/94684/million-tiny-ads
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!