• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Using tinctures in a salve

 
Robyn Morton
Posts: 12
Location: Indiana
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,

I'm hoping someone can help me out here, because my Google-fu has failed me miserably.  My father broke his back in four places recently (!)--he's going to be fine, no paralysis or damage to the spinal cord or neck, thank gods--and I'd like to make him a good bone-healing salve to apply to the area.  I already have comfrey to make a base oil, and I also have a tincture of boneset that I'd like to add, for obvious reasons.  But the tincture is alcohol, which I'm guessing will not incorporate well.  Any suggestions for how I should go about adding the tincture?  Or would it be better to just go and get some dried boneset herb and make an oil infusion to add instead?

All help appreciated--thanks!

Robyn M.
 
Jonathan Byron
Posts: 225
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, it should work. If you incorporate it right (mix thoroughly), it should be fine.

Recipe for a salve made from tincture:

Medicinal Salve Recipe:

75 – 80ml infused oil
10g beeswax
10ml tincture
2 – 5 ml essential oil

Method: ....

http://whisperingearth.wordpress.com/2011/06/19/how-to-make-salves-ointments-and-balms/


Other:
http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/17636-adding-your-tinctures-to-your-salves

http://www.liferesearchuniversal.com/nature2.html
 
                                
Posts: 49
Location: Elmira, ny
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What's the alcohol percentage? If it is 95% alcohol, then it is not a problem to add some to a wax or oil base. If it's more, you can risk growing botulism when you add it to the oil or wax, since the droplets will be sealed from air. It shouldn't matter too much for a salve, but you would have to be careful that the person had no cuts or scratches where the salve was applied; otherwise, they might get wound botulism. Personally, I would warm macerate the herb in oil, strain, and use that. I have found that a rice cooker on warm is great for doing that. Just be sure to keep inside condensation wiped off or leave the lid off. A lidded jar in the sun works good this time of year too.
 
Corin Royal Drummond
Posts: 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
jedimomma Hatfield wrote:Hi all,

I'm hoping someone can help me out here, because my Google-fu has failed me miserably.  My father broke his back in four places recently (!)--he's going to be fine, no paralysis or damage to the spinal cord or neck, thank gods--and I'd like to make him a good bone-healing salve to apply to the area.  I already have comfrey to make a base oil, and I also have a tincture of boneset that I'd like to add, for obvious reasons.  But the tincture is alcohol, which I'm guessing will not incorporate well.  Any suggestions for how I should go about adding the tincture?  Or would it be better to just go and get some dried boneset herb and make an oil infusion to add instead?

All help appreciated--thanks!

Robyn M.


Boneset and comfrey externally will do nothing for broken bones. If you want to give him herbs to heal faster, consider arnica salve externally and nettles and borrage internally as tea (one handful of herbs per liter). Add some peppermint to make it taste good. The nettles and borrage contain a wide spectrum of vitamins, minerals and protein in readily assimilable form. Additionally the nettles contains soluble silica which is incorporated into the collagen matrix of healing tissues and makes them stronger and more flexible.
 
Michaelyn Erickson
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paracelsus McCoy wrote:What's the alcohol percentage? If it is 95% alcohol, then it is not a problem to add some to a wax or oil base. If it's more, you can risk growing botulism when you add it to the oil or wax, since the droplets will be sealed from air. It shouldn't matter too much for a salve, but you would have to be careful that the person had no cuts or scratches where the salve was applied; otherwise, they might get wound botulism. Personally, I would warm macerate the herb in oil, strain, and use that. I have found that a rice cooker on warm is great for doing that. Just be sure to keep inside condensation wiped off or leave the lid off. A lidded jar in the sun works good this time of year too.


Could you please (or someone) explain a bit more about the risk of botulism in tincture-salve? Are you saying that if the alcohol percentage is ABOVE %95 percent you could get botulism? It seems to me that the addition of a high-potency alcohol, or a tincture rather than an oil infusion, would lower your risk of botulism. Isn't that bacteria coming from the plants themselves? It is my understanding that oil infusions could potentially harbor this because of the of the plant material already having it and then it getting transferred to the oil (so by that logic then all oil infusions are at a slight risk)...but a tincture? Alcohol doesn't just kill it?
I am getting ready to produce a salve that we are selling, so I'd like to make sure that I know a bit about these risks.
 
Sharol Tilgner
Posts: 30
Location: Pleasant Hill, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I usually make base salves and add tinctures or ess. oils in later. I am always wanting to tweak a base salve for a patient or myself, so I add it as I need it. I add the tincture until it becomes a consitancy that is still thick enough but I know will become too thin if I continue. This has always been enough for my uses. I can get quite a bit in there as I simple keep stirring until it incorporates. If it sits around, it can come out of solutioin to some degree but generally since it has been made up for a particular situation it gets used quickly and this in not an issue.

Selling a product is entirely different. Now you are talking about having to check for shelf life as you need to have a pull date on it and keep product that you have tested for shelf life to prove your pull date. I would stick to adding essential oils which if they come out of solutioin will not cause an issue over time.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic