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Creighton Samuiels
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Waterglass (Sodium Silicate) is another one of those incrediblely useful chemicals. I've recently discovered that it can be used as a matrix binding agent for high temp construction. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_silicate#Refractory_use) I was wondering if anyone has tried it in a RMH, and how well it held up.

BTW, one of waterglass's most common uses on old homesteads was to preserve raw eggs at room temps...

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_silicate#Food_preservation)
 
allen lumley
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Creighton S. : I know a mention was made that was off on a tangent from what was discussed, I too would like to hear see a report on the subject knowing
that if it was used to make a 'Heat Riser' / Internal chimney, no one would report on it until it failed !

For the good of the craft, be safe/warm ! Pyro Al - Your comments/questions are solicited and Welcome A. L.
 
dave jersey
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The text from Wikipedia: Refractory use

Water glass is a useful binder of solids, such as vermiculite and perlite. When blended with the aforementioned lightweight aggregates, water glass can be used to make hard, high-temperature insulation boards used for refractories, passive fire protection and high temperature insulations, such as moulded pipe insulation applications. When mixed with finely divided mineral powders, such as vermiculite dust (which is common scrap from the exfoliation process), one can produce high temperature adhesives. The intumescence disappears in the presence of finely divided mineral dust, whereby the waterglass becomes a mere matrix. Waterglass is inexpensive and abundantly available, which makes its use popular in many refractory applications.

Hmmm. So this indicates that it might be possible to make a sweeping turn for the exhaust gasses as they exit the burn chamber - not necessarily a good thing but I may try it anyhow in one of my mockup stoves.. I'm planning on putting some thermocouples in various places as i do the test builds to see what is optimum design.


I agree, Alan, that this looks really promising. Thanks for your reply and patience with us noobs.

BTW D Smith i come from your neck of the woods, live in Virginia now but went to Clarkson and SUNY Potsdam!
 
Botho Willer
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So I know this is quite old, but did any of you (especially dave) try this?
 
William Bronson
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I believe Matt Walker may have made some waterglass. It is a moderately hazardous process, but the hazards are easily mitigated.
There are some good tutorials on YouTube.
It is kind of hard to find it pre-made ,as it is no longer commonly used.
My research indicates that Red Devil TSP 90 is very close or identical to dry waterglass.
Some reports indicate that it may include/cause ? flux ,but sufficient alumina content and a long cure at high heat can overcome this and sinster the whole shebang together.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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