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boxes complete with seeds in them  RSS feed

 
paul wheaton
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One of the things that paul stamets has talked about is the idea of embedding seeds in a box. 

The idea is that you receive your package, and then rip the box open and toss the cardboard onto your grass/dirt/whatever.  When spring and summer rolls around, you have an instant garden. 

I first heard paul stamets talk about this in 2006 to a massive crowd.  There was a Q&A at the end and I burned up my one question to ask about the toxicity of cardboard.  As covered in eerie detail in another thread here - most cardboards are gonna contain toxins that I am not comfortable with - but it is possible to have a cardboard that is made entirely out of mechanically processed (as opposed to chemically processed) wood and corn starch - thus making it okay in my book.

I just heard a rumor that this cardboard with seeds thing may be coming out very soon.


 
Jeremy Bunag
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NOw I'll just need to find people or business to send me stuff in said boxes! 
 
                          
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Location: Northern California
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There's a soap that shows up in your more expensive organic grocery boutiques that comes in a recycled cardboard package with a tree seed embedded in it; you plant the package and grow a tree.
 
                    
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http://www.bloomin.com/

i got one of these a few years back. dont know about toxicity of paper, i just recalled it as i read this thread... more to learn!
 
Brenda Groth
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in 2002 a friend sent me a gift from Canada and the card was made with embedded wild flower seeds, which i did plant but couldn't tell you if they ever grew.
 
Matthew Fallon
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pardon me for digging up an old thread (was searching for something else)but
WOW, that is SUCH a cool idea! i'm with you Paul,ive worried too about adding cardboard to my yard...funny thing,my step-father just found a new job(yes!)last week,and it is with a cardboard manufacturer!.

would it be possible to incorporate this idea into homemade paper-making ?
the problem i see right away is that making paper requires making wet pulp from other paper etc then drying it on screens or such...so the seed cant be introduced to that mix since it'd germinate then...hmmm.any ideas out there how to do this this?

,how about if the seeds were coated first with something that iswater-soluble or would wear away, beeswax ,or clay,like that kaolin clay people spray on fruits and grapes etc.would that cause germination?never used it.
or perhaps if the paper was coated on 1 side,then seeds applied while that dried,or another coating to seal them on there ...

sure would make for cool wrapping paper, plant-able artworks,or paper-rolls for planting out a garden?could be color-coded,seeds laid out on 1x1' sheets for square-foot gardening,similar to those roll out mats of "instant flower beds".
heck couldnt any paper/cardboard packaging be made this way? milk cartons etc.

............LOL. ok nevermind, here i thought i was being clever. but people've been seeding all that stuff and more for decades haha.oh well! there are actually dozens of how-to's and videos on doing it. ops:

adding this  one to the project list!
i guess its ok for the seeds to be wet so long as the paper is dried right away.interesting.
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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There are also methods of papermaking where two layers are pressed together after they come out of the slurry, but before they're entirely dry. This strikes me as potentiall offering a minimum time in water, and maximum control over where the seeds (and whatever else: flowers, etc.) end up in the finished product.

In the broader movement toward cottage industry (Reprap and company), it would be nice for small-scale paper mills to eventually be included.
 
jacque greenleaf
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These boxes are now commercially available...

http://www.lifeboxcompany.com/
 
paul wheaton
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Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
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I think an important distinction with this is that it is possible to have a box that would meet my standards for this sort of use.  We have a long thread around here somewhere that goes into a lot of detail about how the paper for the cardboard is made and the glues that hold the corrugation in place. 

Most papers use a chemical paper making process (icky), but a few do use a mechanical process (okay to me).  While most glues these days are based on corn starch, most are also enhanced with some scary (to me) chemicals.  But it is possible to make a glue that meets my standards.

I would guess that this is all using stuff that is within my standards.

 
Matthew Fallon
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Location: long island, ny Z-7a
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funny thing,
my step-father recently found new employment(last company moved out of state months ago) with of a manufacturer of cardboard packaging. im starting to learn more than i ever thought i'd want to about cardboard...

for one, he mentioned that they use starch and caustic soda as the adhesive.so seems its pretty non-toxic i guess(the glue part anyway)
in a month or so im sure he'll be an expert on cardboard
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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